Monday, October 18, 2010

Chron, Merc reject strip's "Muhammad" cartoon

Both the San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News quietly killed a “Non Sequitur” comic strip that mentioned “Muhammad” — a move the author of the strip calls ironic.

“The irony of editors being afraid to run even such a tame cartoon as this that satirizes the blinding fear in media regarding anything surrounding Islam sadly speaks for itself. Indeed, the terrorists have won,” Wiley Miner told a blog that follows the comic strip business, The Daily Cartoonist.

Other papers that didn’t run the Oct. 3 strip include the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune.

Miner’s cartoon asks “Where’s Muhammad?” — a takeoff on the “Where’s Waldo?” books. The comic shows characters in a park buying ice cream, fishing, roller skating, etc. No character is depicted as Middle Eastern.

The fact that the papers had spiked the comic didn’t become public until Washington Post’s ombudsman Andrew Alexander criticized his paper for canceling what he called “a powerful and witty endorsement of freedom of expression.”

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wait! The same papers that are constantly telling us we shouldn't worry about the threat posed by extremist Muslims then spike a cartoon because they don't want to get shot on the street? And they're so timid that they won't even write about it?

Anonymous said...

The cartoon is lame. Maybe they rejected it because it wasn't funny?

Gene Randall said...

If they won't run a mild cartoon like this, imagine what they won't run in their news columns.

Salman Rushdie said...

I think Mohammed is on top of the outhouse!

Anonymous said...

These papers don't censor Doonesbury when he makes fun of Christianity or Catholicism, so why not the same rules for Islam?

Anonymous said...

Political correctness is censorship.

Anonymous said...

The cartoonist should rename the cartoon as 'find the journalist'.

Anonymous said...

The cowering hypocrisy is simply overwhelming. No wonder the credibility of most weak-kneed newspapers is now slim and none.

Anonymous said...

Papers don't check cartoons in advance anymore. They were tipped off by the syndicator, Universal, who not only warned them about the content but offered a substitute cartoon. Had there been no warning, it probably would have run.