Wednesday, August 26, 2009

More layoffs ahead for the Chronicle

The Guild's Chronicle unit chair, Michelle Devera, says management has given the union a "heads-up" that more layoffs are planned. She said in a posting on the Guild's site that she wasn't told how many jobs would be cut.

Another Guild official, Carl T. Hall, told the SF Weekly's Joe Eskenazi the same thing. "We're anticipating some discussions," Hall said. "And it's not good news. But that's all I know."

Hall said no reason was given for the paper's announcement other than "what one might infer: I guess it's a continuing problem of getting costs in line with revenues given the state of the economy and the goings on in the news business."

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

So sad. Hearst has just made a mess of the paper for the past 9 years. Is this just a prelude to the rumored shuttering of the print version by October?

Anonymous said...

The Chronicle needs to add more reporters to cover the issues people care about--how bad conservatives are and how good and decent progressives have been. Also they should report on things that concern gays and people who like to eat in fine restaurants. If they did thise things I'm absolutely sure they would make a profit.

Anonymous said...

I don't think they're closing the print version because they're on the hook for hundreds of millions with their new printer. Look for a less bold, less colorful, less newsy Chronicle in October.

Anonymous said...

It's not just the Chronicle that's dying, San Francisco is dying. Businesses of all sizes are moving away, to be replaced with more government welfare agencies and nonprofits. Those who happen to work in SF these days work at government or nonprofit jobs, and don't produce much of anything. The streets are full of homeless, drug use is rampant and prostitution is done openly (I'm talking about the sex, not political). The streets smell of urine. Tourism is down, declining every year for a decade now. The murder rate hovers at about 200 a year, the same per capita as Compton. Even if the Chronicle wanted to refocus on the suburbs, residents there get their news from other sources than the Chronicle.

Anonymous said...

It was Phil Bronstein who directed the Chronicle to abandon the suburbs a few years ago with the immortal line, "You can't out local the locals." That turned out to be a wise decision.