Friday, May 15, 2009

Newsom: Under 30 crowd won't miss Chron

In a routine newspapers-are-dying-technology-is-king story in the Economist, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom is quoted as saying that if the Chronicle closes, "People under 30 won’t even notice." No other quotes from 41-year-old mayor in the story, though the Economist did a glowing profile of him in its May 19 issue.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

That's because the under-30 crowd has the attention span of a gnat and the intelligence of morons.
Plus, they want everything to be free. Sad to say that this will be the era noted for mankind's slipping into stupidity and dumbness. And to think, it started with this under-30 crowd.
Yes, I'm an old fart, old enough to remember when Eisenhower was president, twice. But at least I can accept ink and print newspapers and newspapers online. And I know the difference between an LP (vinyl) and CD and MP3 player.

Anonymous said...

Gavin may be over 30, but I'll betcha never reads newspapers. He seems to be very shallow, somebody who wants to appear like he's running the city by holding news conferences and issuing press releases. But he comes off like a spoiled trust funder who is being propped up by others.

Anonymous said...

Politicians like Gavin would love for newspapers to go away so that they won't be anyone looking over his shoulder.

Fred Dodsworth said...

The under-30 crowd doesn't read daily regional newspapers because those publications don't offer that group enough of interest to warrant their readership! Alt-newspapers and niche publications are well read by the under-30 crowd because those periodicals cater to their interests. If you don't believe me, ask Will Hearst, who said just that to me eight years ago in an interview published on the front page of the SF Examiner! Newspapers are dying because they, like the Republican party, have consciously and deliberately made themselves irrelevant by catering to an isolated and diminishing demographic of over-30-conservative-property-owners. Any attempt to up-date newspaper editorial coverage has been met by howls of outrage from those same folk, who typically threaten to, or actually cancel their subscriptions when they don't get their way.
Once again, Gavin is right and the bitter, old whiners who have monopolized the Bay Area's news media are wrong.

Chip Barrett said...

Going back generations, young people have never been that interested in newspapers or news until they have a stake in society, like a mortgage, kids in school or ownership of a business. Then they pay great attention to the news because they've got more to worry about.

Fred exaggerates the influence of the alt-weeklies probably because their one-sided news coverage reinforces his political beliefs. If you look at their circulation claims, none of them say they print more than 100,000 copies per week. So we're talking about a penetration rate of 1.6 percent in a media market of 6.2 million people. That puts alt-weeklies at the bottom, way below regional dailies, community weeklies, TV, radio and online. The video screens you now see above gas pumps probably have more readers than the alt-weeklies.