Friday, January 16, 2009

Hearst looking seriously at paperless papers

Hearst Corp., which has put the Seattle Post Intelligencer up for sale and said it will stop printing it in 60 days, is asking employees for ideas on how it could operate online-only publication.

The move is significant since Hearst, which owns the Chronicle, has lost much more money in San Francisco than it has in Seattle, and may be considering online options here.

P-I reporter Dan Richman said the paper's staff got a memo from Editor and Publisher Roger Oglesby who said the company is seeking ideas from employees on "how to maintain and grow our online audience so we might have the competitive advantage in the market" and "ideas to help us drive the revenue side of the business."

Hearst also is seeking "ideas for partnerships, part-time models, revenue sharing, freelancing and any other creative types of structures that might help us reach our goal of creating a profitable business model in the market."


Robert B. Livingston said...

Here's a pleasant thought:

When courage to publish real news is universally lacking-- the one establishment paper that finds it and upholds it will have the greatest competitive advantage.

Here's a more realistic thought:

When there is no longer any demand for truth, risk-adverse players invest in propaganda-- not news.

Our country today is totally benighted. Whether relying on paper or pixels, establishment newspapers were unable to stop that from happening.

Next week, a man will become president who was not born in this country.

For most of us, that is an improvement over getting a president that was never elected!

How more blind can we be?

Anonymous said...

Instead of going completely paperless, my guess is that the Chron will cut back printing to just two or three days a week -- maybe Thursday, Friday and Sunday. I'll bet the printed Sunday edition remains for decades to come because people have time to spend reading the Sunday paper.