Friday, February 22, 2008

Union may have to pay paper's legal fees

A union that tried to stop the Marin Independent Journal from getting the salaries of government workers might have to pay the legal fees that newspaper incurred in its fight to get the information. The AP's Paul Elias reports that the California Court of Appeal in San Francisco heard arguments in the case Thursday.

In September 2006, the Marin County Management Association, representing 300 middle managers among the 2,100 county employees, convinced Judge Michael Dufficy to block the release of the salaries to the newspaper. The MediaNews paper appealed. While the appeal moved through the courts, the California Supreme Court ruled on Aug. 27, 2007 that government salaries were public record. So it is likely that Marin County will soon release the salaries to the Marin IJ. However, Thursday's hearing concerned whether the union has to now pay the newspaper's legal fees. The AP story did not give a dollar amount for the legal fees.


Anonymous said...

This item isn't plain enough. Think about what the union did. It went to court to prevent a public record from being released. It attempted to violate the First Amendment.

And what was the union's goal? Probably to stop the citizens/taxpayers/voters in Marin County from realizing how much money government employees are being paid. Government employees are paid double what their private sector counterparts make -- and if the public understood that, they'd vote "no" on every tax increase that hits the ballot. So of course the union is going to fight to keep salaries secret. Duh!

Anonymous said...

unions are simply fighting for working people to have better lives. the implication here is outrageous.