Thursday, May 19, 2005

Winners announced in high school contest

For the second year in a row, the Burlingame B, the student newspaper at Burlingame High School, took first-place honors in General Excellence. The B and its staff members also won a total of five awards in the 2004-2005 Peninsula Press Club High School Journalism Awards Competition.

Palo Alto High School's Campanile newspaper and Paly Voice Web site were honored with nine awards.

The contest is sponsored by the Peninsula Press Club, Hillsdale Shopping Center and the journalism program at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont. Awards were presented at a reception May 18 in Ralston Hall on the Belmont campus of NDNU.

Nine publications from eight high schools from Daly City to Palo Alto provided 222 entries for the competition which covered April 1, 2004, through March 31, 2005. Professional journalists and members of the Press Club served as judges for the contest.

Here's a complete list of the winners:

General Excellence
First: Burlingame High School B;
Second: Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Eastside College Prep Panther;
Honorable Mention: Mills High School Thunderbolt.

Layout & Design
First: Burlingame High School B;
Second: Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Mills High School Thunderbolt.
HM: Eastside College Prep Panther.

News Story
First: Alicia Rovai-Cruz, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Alex Montalvo, Burlingame High School B;
Third: Jonathan Steinman, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
HM: Danny Snyder, Palo Alto High School Campanile.

Feature Story
First: Kim Segall, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Second: Anjali Albuquerque, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Third: Alex Montalvo, Burlingame High School B;
HM: Tim Chang, Palo Alto High School Campanile.

Editorial
First: Alexis Salas, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Karishma Oza, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Third: Stephanie Chan, Mills High School Thunderbolt;
HM: Soumya Sringesh, Palo Alto High School Campanile;

Sports Story
First: Jonathan Steinman, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Second: David Tufo, Burlingame High School B;
Third: Vallery Armas, Mills High School Thunderbolt;
HM: Thomas O'Connell and Laura Mitchell, Palo Alto High School's Paly Voice.

News Photo
First: Michaelle Fernandez; Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Bianca Padilla, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Nicole Faumuina, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom.

Feature Photo
First: Robin McNulty, Palo Alto High School's Paly Voice;
Second: Michaelle Fernandez, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom.

Sports Photo
First: Jose Ibarra, Eastside College Prep Panther;
Second: Rachel Altmaier, Pinewood School Panther Prints;
Third: Rachel Altmaier, Pinewood School Panther Prints;
HM: Luis A. Torres, Eastside College Prep Panther.

Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Merc reports huge circulation decline

Editor & Publisher Magazine

By Jennifer Saba

NEW YORK -- The San Jose Mercury News reported its spring circulation numbers Monday, two weeks after most other daily newspapers did, and the filing shows that the Knight Ridder paper experienced one of the biggest circ drops in the industry. For the six-month period ending March 2005, daily circ at the Mercury News declined 7.1%, or 19,890, to 259,649 copies. Sunday circ fell 9.9%, or 30,793, to 277,632 copies.

The California paper did not file its Publishers Statement on time, missing the Audit Bureau of Circulations' FAS-FAX report released May 3. A spokesperson for Knight Ridder previously said that the Mercury News was handling its yearly audit with the organization at the same time their six-month Publishers Statement was due, hence the delay. (Later Tuesday, a Mercury News official explained that the drops were caused by reductions in other-paid circulation. See article here.)

The Mercury News' numbers were reported in ABC's supplemental Fas-Fax, released Monday. This report provides circulation data on publications that filed their Publisher's Statements after the deadline for the regular FAS-FAX. The supplement also contains corrections to data shown in the original report.

Other papers to make an appearance on the supplemental report: The Boston Globe, which made a minor adjustment to its weekday Friday average by exactly one copy, from 434,330 to 434,329. The paper experienced other changes as well, including a decrease of 983 copies made to its Saturday numbers, to 178,233. The change stems from the more-than-50% paid column, which declined by 983 copies on the same day to 169,009.

The Oregonian in Portland shifted some of its circulation as well. In the supplemental FAS-FAX, the paper made dramatic gains in the more-than-50% paid category. In that column, Monday through Friday increased by 44,799 copies, to 315,717 (wiping out the entire 25%-to-50%-paid column). Sunday showed similar gains in that category.

Mostly small to medium-sized papers also showed up in the 19 page report. The Morning Call in Allentown, Pa., experienced decreases in both daily and Sunday circ, down 3.3% and 4.7% respectively. The Enid News & Eagle in Oklahoma also slipped in daily 4.9% and Sunday 4.7%.

In Colorado, the Fort Collins Coloradoan experienced minor dips. The Pantagraph in Bloomington, Ill., reported daily declines of 1.6% to 47,163, as Sunday decreased 2.5% to 49,329.

The Advocate in Baton Rouge, La., slipped slightly daily but Sunday showed small gains at 0.3% to 121,931.



Jennifer Saba is an associate editor at E&P.
Mercury News reports huge circulation losses
The San Jose Mercury News reported its spring circulation numbers Monday, two weeks after most other daily newspapers did, and the filing shows that the Knight Ridder paper experienced one of the biggest circ drops in the industry. For the six-month period ending March 2005, daily circ at the Mercury News declined 7.1%, or 19,890, to 259,649 copies. Sunday circ fell 9.9%, or 30,793, to 277,632 copies.

Sunday, May 15, 2005

May 2005 Press Club board minutes

At the San Mateo Daily News

Board Members Present: Micki Carter, John Kane, Dave Price
Also Present: PPC Executive Director Darryl Compton, Member Peter Cleveland
Absent: Aimee Lewis, Jon Mays, Ed Remitz, Jack Russell, Bill Workman.

President Carter called the meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.

Compton presented the Treasurer's report, but no action was taken due to the lack of a quorum

Except for some noise and food-serving problems resulting from the long line at the bar (because there was only one bartender), the review of the Annual Awards competition was mostly favorable. Carter pointed out that the Awards program was over by 9:35 p.m. Despite the slow service and noise form a fifth-grade graduation next door, the Board expressed hope that these problems can be addressed and next year's event can again be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Foster City. Darryl will work with Aimee Lewis to see if we can be reimbursed for the five meals that were never served.

Several ideas were advanced for improving the program. Compton suggested that awards be announced by category, rather than by division. That way, the entire room will be continuously involved in the awards. Carter, the MC, also suggested that past years' monologue script be abandoned in favor of a looser, screen-oriented format.

It was also advanced that it should not be necessary to remove bylines from entries, as our remote judges don't know local entries.

Referring to the report on entries prepared by Compton, Price praised the board for a "great achievement" by attracting a greater number of entries in each of the past few years. Compton reported that a new source for plaques reduced the cost of plaques from about $4,000 in the past to about $1,500 this year, a great savings for the PPC.

Carter reported that, at the awards dinner, three members expressed interest in joining the PPC board. They are long-time radio industry executive Cleveland, a former PPC president; Jamie Cassini of the Examiner; and Jay Thorwaldson of the Palo Alto Weekly. The board will consider new board members at its next meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the San Mateo Daily News. There will be no board meeting in July.

Tentative date for the annual PPC picnic was set for Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Belmont home of Micki Carter and Mike Venturino.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

Wednesday, May 4, 2005

Unflattering profile of Chron publisher

Tommy Craggs, writing for the SF Weekly, says that the new publisher of the SF Chron has been cast as a villain, but may be exactly what the Hearst Corp. needs to defeat the dark forces of the new economy.
    Since taking over in January, Vega has methodically gone about charming the better part of a jittery Chronicle. He estimates he has met face to face with at least 500 employees, mostly in small groups in his conference room, but also on smoke breaks and walks through the building. One of his first moves was to throw open the doors inside the Chronicle, where in the past you'd need a swipe key to get from office to office. "We're a newspaper," Vega says. "We're supposed to be open to the public, and we weren't even open to ourselves. I think people appreciate the fact that there's a little more of an open society here than there was."