Tuesday, December 27, 2005

S.F. battle of weeklies heats up

The quest for dominance by San Francisco's two alternative weekly papers, Bruce Brugmann's Bay Guardian and the New Times-owned SF Weekly, has reached angry and almost comic levels, writes the Sacramento Bee's Herbert A. Sample, with a New Times editor calling Brugmann "bull-goose loony." Brugmann (photo right) says New Times has unfairly lowered rates in order to force him to sell ads at below cost, a charge the chain denies. Brugmann says the chain's execs don't like San Francisco and, "They don't really belong here."

Sunday, December 25, 2005

Moment of truth for Tony Ridder

L.A. Times writer Joseph Menn writes that the shareholder battle for control of Knight Ridder is also a referendum on the management style of CEO and Chairman Tony Ridder, who desperately wants his company to remain independent but has been unable to keep its stock price high enough to satisfy major institutional investors. Ridder, 65, a resident of Woodside, "is known for his love of expensive cars and vacations," Menn writes. "He received $4.6 million in total compensation last year — down 41% from 2003 — ranking 63rd among CEOs of California's 100 biggest public companies."

Friday, December 23, 2005

Daily News publishers ride into sunset

Dave Price (left) and Jim Pavelich, co-publishers of the Palo Alto Daily News and its five sister daily newspapers, are stepping down from the company they started 10 years ago. Knight Ridder bought the Daily News in Feburary and the two publishers stayed on during the transition. KR also asked them to start free dailies in other U.S. cities. But in November, a group of shareholders demanded the sale of KR, which stopped all corporate expansion. As a result, Price and Pavelich decided to leave KR to move forward with their own newspaper projects elsewhere. (E&P's coverage) (AP story)

Wednesday, December 21, 2005

Examiner editor transferred to D.C. paper

Vivienne Sosnowski, who has been executive editor of billionaire Phil Anschutz's SF Examiner for the past 17 months, has been transferred to a similar post at his "Examiner" in Washington, D.C. (AP report), ("Revolving door" at Washington Examiner)

Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Retired KR exec to head ANG newspapers

Fred Mott, who retired last year after a 26-year career with Knight Ridder, has been named the new publisher and chief executive of ANG Newspapers, the owner of the Oakland Tribune, San Mateo County Times, Tri-Valley Herald and other Bay Area papers. Mott replaces John Schueler, who quit ANG in September to take a job in Florida. Mott's background is in accounting. He earned a bachelor's degree in accounting from Florida State University in 1972, then worked for six years as a CPA for Deloitte and Touche. He joined Knight Ridder in 1979 as director of financial reporting. He was general manager of the Tallahassee Democrat from 1984 to 1991 and publisher of the Gary (Indiana) Post-Tribune from 1991 to 1995, when he was named publisher of The (Columbia, S.C.) State. His last stop with KR was as president and general manager of the Philadelphia Inqurier and Philadelphia Daily News.

Monday, December 19, 2005

Top 10 SF media blunders of 2005

The way SF's alternative online daily Beyond Chron sees it, "Big media in San Francisco has been awful for years. Shoddy local coverage, lack of diverse perspectives, and weak analysis of issues have all conspired to make the daily offerings brutal reads. 2005, however, introduced new lows to the local media scene. From drops in circulation to blatant plagiarizing, from firing the best to hiring the worst, our city’s corporate media presented a field day for anyone looking for proof that to find the real scoop, you need to head online."

Chronicle may outsource printing

SF Chronicle Publisher Frank Vega (photo left), known as "Darth Vader" by friends and foes, says the paper "has been in discussions with a third party" about contracting out its printing. That would leave the Chron's 450 union printers and mailers without jobs. Newspapers & Technology, a printing trade publication, says a Canadian firm, Transcon, may be a contender for the job. Locally, the San Mateo Daily Journal and the Daily News Group (Palo Alto Daily News, San Mateo Daily News, etc.) outsource their printing to Southwest Offset in Redwood City. Southwest also prints the 70,000-circ Daily Breeze of Torrance, Calif, at its Southern California plant.

Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Bay Guardian wins ruling in New Times suit

The Bay Guardian has won a pair of pre-trial victories in its lawsuit against the chain that owns the SF Weekly and East Bay Express, according to a report in the Guardian. San Francisco Superior Court Judge Richard Kramer ordered the New Times Media chain to immediately begin producing internal documents that the Guardian had been seeking. The judge also rejected a request by New Times to close the hearing in the case. The Guardian has accused the SF Weekly and East Bay Express, both owned by New Times, of selling ads below cost in an effort to drive the locally owned Guardian out of business.

UCLA study finds media bias is real

In what's billed as possibly the first successful attempt at objectively quantifying bias in the news media, a UCLA-led study found that the news pages of the Wall Street Journal are even more liberal than The New York Times. The Drudge Report may have a right-wing reputation, but it leans left. Coverage by public television and radio is conservative compared to the rest of the mainstream media. Meanwhile, almost all major media outlets tilt to the left.

Tuesday, December 13, 2005

KRON merges reporting, photography jobs

Two articles describe how Channel 4 has turned all of its reporters and photographers into one-person news crews. The change was first reported by TVWeek.com on Nov. 14. The journalism blog site gradethenews.com posted its own version Dec. 13.

Monday, December 12, 2005

Chron may sell Fifth & Mission offices

Chron Publisher Frank Vega, according to a Matier and Ross column item, has confirmed that a developer is interested in buying the newspaper's Fifth and Mission offices, including its clock-tower building and the adjoining old Examiner offices. Vega says the building isn't for sale and that those offices would only be moved if it made financial sense.

Sunday, December 11, 2005

Chron struggles as Internet siphons readers, ads
Los Angeles Times reports that SF paper's problems are being watched closely in the battle between old and new media.

Monday, December 5, 2005

Anchor Doug Murphy dies in fire
Doug Murphy, who had anchored KPIX Channel 5 newscasts since the 1980s, was killed Dec. 4 in a fire that swept through his Lafayette home. The cause of the fire, which began in the attic, has not been determined, according to the SF Chronicle.

Saturday, December 3, 2005

New PPC Newsletter is out
The new Peninsula Press Club newsletter is available here online. Ballot for club officers appears on page 3; please mail by Dec. 15.

Sunday, November 20, 2005

November Press Club board minutes
Minutes of the Nov. 16 meeting of the Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors.

Meeting was brought to order at 6:20 p.m. by Board President Micki Carter.

Carter and board members Jack Russell, Peter Cleaveland, Ed Remitz, John Kane and Jon Mays were present. Executive Director Darryl Compton arrived shortly after the meeting began and board member Jamie Casini arrived at 6:50 p.m.

--The minutes of the October meeting were approved.

--Treasury report: Compton reported $28,000 in the bank and that pennies in interest was earned. He also reported receiving a check from San Francisco State University for scholarship award winner Sara Wolfram.


Old Business:

--There was no discussion on communication with the defunct San Francisco Press Club.

--Newsletter deadline of Nov. 17 was announced.

--Limited discussion on 2006 meeting dates. No changes discussed.


New Business:

--It was decided that the following people would be placed on the ballot: Vice president, Jack Russell; Treasurer, Ed Remitz; Secretary, Jon Mays. Board members: Dave Price, Aimee Lewis Strain, Jamie Casini, Peter Cleaveland and John Kane. Carter will move into a new role as immediate past president. There is an opening for president and the board left it up to the members not present to announce if they have any inclination to be placed on the ballot for president.
--A raise for Compton and roster changes were not discussed and will be brought up by the next meeting.

--It was agreed that board members would propose any changes to the newspaper contest rules by e-mail. If consensus cannot be reached by e-mail, then it will be discussed at a special meeting Dec. 5 before the Christmas Party and annual meeting. Mays suggested future discussions on rule changes begin earlier in the year to avoid any possible conflict.

--Russell said he will continue to serve as scholarship chair.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:10 p.m. Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

November 2005 Press Club board minutes

Minutes of the Nov. 16 meeting of the Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors.

Meeting was brought to order at 6:20 p.m. by Board President Micki Carter.

Carter and board members Jack Russell, Peter Cleaveland, Ed Remitz, John Kane and Jon Mays were present. Executive Director Darryl Compton arrived shortly after the meeting began and board member Jamie Casini arrived at 6:50 p.m.

The minutes of the October meeting were approved.

Treasury report: Compton reported $28,000 in the bank and that pennies in interest was earned. He also reported receiving a check from San Francisco State University for scholarship award winner Sara Wolfram.


Old Business:

There was no discussion on communication with the defunct San Francisco Press Club.

Newsletter deadline of Nov. 17 was announced.

Limited discussion on 2006 meeting dates. No changes discussed.


New Business:

It was decided that the following people would be placed on the ballot: Vice president, Jack Russell; Treasurer, Ed Remitz; Secretary, Jon Mays. Board members: Dave Price, Aimee Lewis Strain, Jamie Casini, Peter Cleaveland and John Kane. Carter will move into a new role as immediate past president. There is an opening for president and the board left it up to the members not present to announce if they have any inclination to be placed on the ballot for president.

A raise for Compton and roster changes were not discussed and will be brought up by the next meeting.

It was agreed that board members would propose any changes to the newspaper contest rules by e-mail. If consensus cannot be reached by e-mail, then it will be discussed at a special meeting Dec. 5 before the Christmas Party and annual meeting. Mays suggested future discussions on rule changes begin earlier in the year to avoid any possible conflict.

Russell said he will continue to serve as scholarship chair.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:10 p.m. Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.
'Heartbroken' Chron reporter claims plagiarism was unintentional
Reporter Edward Guthmann tells the SF Weekly: "At one point, I read about the 1,000th suicide in the New Yorker article and pasted two sentences in my text as a 'flag' -- a reminder to myself to mention the fact. But when I went back to the piece, which may have been days later since I had other work during that time, I forgot those weren't my words. I should have set them in boldface or larger type, or not moved them at all. Huge mistake ..." Managing Editor Robert Rosenthal calls it a "serious matter" and says the investigation isn't over.
Press Club's Christmas Party Dec. 5
The Peninsula Press Club will return to Harry's Hofbrau in Redwood City for its annual Holiday Party. The 6-8 p.m. event will take place in the private room at Harry's, 1909 El Camino Real, RC. Members are asked to bring $10 per person and canned food for Second Harvest. An all-membership annual meeting will be scheduled for 7:30 p.m. See you there!

Saturday, November 12, 2005

Reader discovers Chron plagiarized parts of article
Story about Golden Gate Bridge jumpers, printed on the Oct. 30 Sunday edition's front page, were lifted from a 2003 New Yorker article.

Thursday, November 3, 2005

KR sale may spark industry consolidation

Joseph T. Hallinan and Joe Hagan of the Wall Street Journal report that a potential sale of Mercury News and Contra Costa Times owner Knight Ridder could spark the beginning of a consolidation of the newspaper industry.

KR sale could lead to industry consolidation

Along with steel, autos and airlines, daily newspapers would seem to be yet another mature U.S. industry that is prime for consolidation, the Wall Street Journal says in an article today by Joseph T. Hallinan and Joe Hagan. Analysts are increasingly pessimistic about the prospects for growth as advertising revenue continues to move online. Stocks of many newspaper companies now trade near multiyear lows. In a letter to the KR's board, PCM chief executive Bruce Sherman said that Knight Ridder has determined that its breakup value far exceeds its stock price, and that directors should "aggressively pursue the competitive sale of the company."

Wednesday, November 2, 2005

Knight Ridder debate has a Republican twist
Top executives of Private Capital Management, the shareholder group that is forcing the sale of Knight Ridder, donated $112,000 to help President Bush and Dick Cheney get re-elected. On April 8, 2004, the head of PCM, Bruce Sherman, and company executive Gregg Powers gave $50,000 each, or $100,000 total, to the Republican National Committee.

Tuesday, November 1, 2005

Knight Ridder shareholder urges sale

The biggest shareholder of Knight Ridder (parent of the Mercury News, Contra Costa Times and Palo Alto Daily News group) is urging the company to seek a buyer, saying there are few other options left for a chain whose stock price has been dropping, according to an Associated Press report.

Friday, October 21, 2005

Bay Guardian sues SF Weekly owner alleging predatory pricing
Bay Guardian editor Tim Redmond reports that his newspaper has sued the New Times chain and its local papers, the SF Weekly and East Bay Express, for violating U.S. antitrust laws and California's Business and Professions Code. Specifically, the Guardian claims New Times is selling ads at below cost, forcing the Bay Guardian to do the same. Eventually the Guardian's pockets will run out of money faster than New Times, and that's unfair, or at least that's how the legal theory goes.

Wednesday, October 19, 2005

October 2005 Press Club board minutes

Meeting brought to order at 6:18 p.m.

Present: FULL HOUSE! Micki Carter, John Cane, Darryl Compton, Jamie Casini, Jon Mays, Peter Cleveland, Ed Remitz, Aimee Lewis Strain, Dave Price

Minutes of the September meeting were approved.

Treasury Report:

$120 spent on annual PPC picnic

$20 on Schmoozerama, a media networking event

Board approved Compton's report

Old Business:

Carter said she spoke with James Kelly regarding the purchase of the San Francisco Press Club's URL. Kelly told Carter that they want to dump their server and don't want the name to be lost. Discussion revolved around the purchase of the domain name to drive traffic to the Peninsula Press Club's Web site. Carter said she does not know the price or if and when the last payment was made by the SFPC to keep their URL. Carter said the SFPC name was not for sale, rather the URL.

Price said he was concerned that there was no guarantee that Kelly has the right to sell the URL to the PPC. Price was concerned with existing SFPC bylaws and any other legal issues. He said he doesn't feel comfortable because if there's no authorization from the proper people than we could have some potential legal problems. Price suggested obtaining a resolution from the existing board.

Price also suggested purchasing the SFPC name and licensing it out to San Francisco State University for their uses.

Carter agreed to talk to other people that may be associated with the SFPC to find out more information.

New Business:

The annual Christmas party will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 14 at Harry's Hofbrau, located at 1909 El Camino Real, Redwood City. The party will begin at 6 p.m. and end at 8 p.m. Kane agreed to book the back room and make all other arrangements.

The board agreed that the cost will be $10. Guests will be asked to bring canned food for the holiday drive at the Second Harvest Food Bank.

Compton said that last year's party cost about $700. About 50 percent of that was brought in by guests, he said.

The board agreed to make the Christmas party the annual membership meeting as well.

The board agreed once again to meet on Nov. 16 and Dec. 14 so that Remitz can make the meeting.

The board agreed to discuss PPC elections at the November meeting. Beloved PPC President Carter has been termed out so the board needs to elect a new chief. A new treasurer needs to be chosen too, since Bill Workman can no longer serve in that capacity. Carter said she plans to put a ballot in the newsletter.

Board expressed desire for Workman to remain on board. Carter stated that Workman brings a "keen perspective" to the board. The board hopes to find transportation for Workman so he can attend the monthly meetings.

Compton agreed to provide the board with a raise proposal by the New Year.

PPC awards contest rules to be discussed at November meeting.

Board discussed resurrecting the Bench, Bar, Media event. Carter and Strain agreed to discuss it further and Strain said she would make some calls and bring up findings at November meeting.

Meeting was adjourned at 7:21 p.m.

Monday, October 17, 2005

False report of arrest came from Bronstein

SF Chron Editor Phil Bronstein was preparing to be interviewed by Fox News when he overheard a tip that a caretaker was arrested in the murder of Daniel Horowitz's wife, according to mediabistro.com. A producer at Fox heard the same thing, and when the camera went on, the anchor asked Bronstein about the tip. He told the audience what he knew, and Fox turned it into a story -- without checking it. Twenty minutes later, Fox had to retract the story.

Friday, October 14, 2005

Knight Ridder buys South Bay weeklies

Knight Ridder is buying Silicon Valley Community Newspapers, which publishes eight weekly free-distribution newspapers in the South Bay area surrounding KR's San Jose Mercury News.

The eight are: Los Gatos Weekly-Times, Saratoga News, Cupertino Courier, Sunnyvale Sun, Campbell Reporter, Willow Glen Resident, Rose Garden Resident and Almaden Resident. The group also includes the San Jose City Times, a legal newspaper, and a glossy publication called Image.

The newspapers are weekly publications with a combined circulation of more than 157,000. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

David Cohen, currently publisher and CEO of the group, who manages and operates the publications, will continue to do so for Knight Ridder. He will report to KR's Greg Goff, vice president of speciality publications. The plan is to maintain the operations as they are now configured, Goff said.

"These weeklies have been serving readers for 20 years," said Goff. "They provide saturation coverage of their respective areas in the South Bay and are a good fit with our Palo Alto Daily News Group of free dailies, which are located primarily in the Peninsula. We're very pleased to be adding them to our company."

Cohen said, "This was an easy decision, because I know that Knight Ridder is committed to continuing our high quality, fiercely local coverage. With the resources of Knight Ridder, we will be able to fulfill our vision of bringing our brand of community journalism to a greater audience."

The oldest of the papers dates back more than 120 years. The weeklies provide coverage of local schools, youth sports, local government, business, law enforcement, features, opinions and community profiles.

Wednesday, September 7, 2005

SF Weekly attacks Brugmann
Warning. This isn't pretty. San Francisco's two alt weeklies are at each other's throats. Here's the SF Weekly's latest attack on Bruce Brugmann (right), owner of the Bay Guardian. When Brugmann responds, we'll post that too.

Thursday, August 11, 2005

August 2005 Press Club board minutes

Minutes of Aug. 10, 2005 Peninsula Press Club Board meeting

Board members present: Micki Carter, John Kane, Jon Mays, Ed Remitz Also Present: PPC Executive Director Darryl Compton, Member Peter Cleveland

Absent: Dave Price, Aimee Lewis, Jack Russell, Bill Workman.

President Carter called the meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.

Compton presented the Treasurer's report, but no action was taken due to the lack of a quorum. There was minimal discussion of raising Compton's pay.

A motion to nominate Peter Cleveland to the board was made by John Kane and seconded by Ed Remitz. A vote will be conducted by e-mail because of the lack of quorum.

Carter announced the San Mateo County Sports Hall of Fame gave $600 to be held in trust until next year's PPC awards banquet so it could be given as a scholarship in memory of Merv Harris, late sports writer.

There was some discussion of communicating with SF Bay Guardian Publisher Bruce Brugmann about his recent issues with the East Bay Press Club. Carter said she will send him an e-mail.


Tentative date for the annual PPC picnic was set for Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Belmont home of Micki Carter and Mike Venturino.

The meeting was adjourned at 7 p.m.

Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Wednesday, August 10, 2005

Watch what you say on sports-talk radio
David Pollack of the SJ Mercury News reports that the firing of KNBR's Larry Krueger has dominated the sports-talk airwaves. And both the station and the Giants went out of their way to say the team played no role in KNBR's decision. Krueger, program manager Bob Agnew and morning show producer Tony Rhein were dismissed late Tuesday night (Aug. 9). Earlier that day, Rhein put two comic sound bites over the air that station General Manager Tony Salvadore called an attempt to ridicule Giants Manager Felipe Alou. Krueger referred to "brain-dead Caribbean hitters hacking at slop nightly'' on Aug. 3.

Thursday, July 28, 2005

Guild approves 'terrible' Chronicle agreement
About 120 newsroom, advertising and circulation employees at the San Francisco Chronicle are expected to lose their jobs as the result of a five-year contract approved by the 900-member Northern California Media Workers Guild. The vote was 574-119 in favor of the deal, which was reached tentatively on July 24 and takes effect immediately (July 28). There were five abstentions. Guild President Michael Cabanatuan said, "I'm glad that it passed, but mostly I feel sad." The paper's management has said cuts are necessary to keep the financially struggling newspaper afloat. An auditor with the Communications Workers of America who reviewed financial records told the Guild that the paper lost at least $62 million in 2004.

Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Peninsula journalist, publisher Malott dies

Adele Renee' Malott, a longtime journalist and co-publisher of The Boutique and Villager, weekly newspapers in Burlingame and Hillsborough, died Friday (July 22) in Reno, Nev., from a brief illness at age 70, according to the Oakland Tribune. She wrote a weekly newspaper column for senior travelers that was distributed by The New York Times Syndicate, was the publisher of The Mature Traveler newsletter and co-authored a number of books. One of them was the recent "The Mature Traveler's Book of Deals," published in 1998. In 1981, Malott started Friendly Exchange magazine, with a circulation of more than 3 million, while she was a senior editor at The Webb Company in St. Paul, Minn. She continued as the magazine's editor in chief until 1997. She was a regular faculty member of the Reader's Digest Writers' workshops and worked for the Daily Local News in West Chester, Pa.; the St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce in St. Paul; WTCN-TV in Minneapolis; and KGB Radio in San Diego. Malott received dozens of awards for writing, editing and photography from the National Federation of Press Women, California Newspaper Association, the San Francisco Press Club and the Society of American Travel Writers (SATW). She was a member of SATW and was president of the society and chair of SATW's Western Chapter. She also was a founding member of the Peninsula Press Club in San Mateo.

Wednesday, July 6, 2005

NLRB sides against Chronicle pressmen

The National Labor Relations Board claims that the pressman's union violated labor laws by refusing to negotiate for a contract with the Chronicle, according to a report in today's Chron, and the dispute is now headed to an administrative law judge. The union, representing 250 press operators and pre-press workers, has said it held three "negotiating sessions" with the Chron, but management doesn't consider them to be official contract talks.

Currently, the Chron dealing with several unions who contracts expired June 30.

Negotiations are taking place with the Media Workers Guild (870 editorial, advertising, circulation and customer service employees), Mailers Union (350 who insert pre-printed sections) and Typographical Union (30 artists and others who design ads).

On Friday, management reached an agreement with the Teamsters who maintain its buildings.

The Paperhandlers Union, representing 20 people, has ratified a contract.

Vendors Local 468, representing 24 independent contractors who sell the paper at kiosks, has reached a tentative contract agreement but has not yet ratified it.

The Chron's contract with its Teamster drivers doesn't expire until 2010.

Thursday, June 23, 2005

Daily News entry forces ANG to abort free daily

GradeTheNews.org reports that Dean Singleton, chairman of Media News (owner of the ANG Newspapers in the East Bay) pulled the plug on plans to start a free daily in Berkeley after the founders of the Palo Alto Daily News, Dave Price and Jim Pavelich, started a paper in Berkeley first. Price and Pavelich launched the East Bay Daily News in May. Price and Pavelich sold their newspapers to Knight Ridder in February and this is the first of what is expected to be several free dailies they're expected to launch for KR.

Thursday, June 16, 2005

June 2005 Press Club board minutes

Board Members Present: Micki Carter, John Kane, Dave Price

Also Present: PPC Executive Director Darryl Compton, Member Peter Cleveland

Absent: Aimee Lewis, Jon Mays, Ed Remitz, Jack Russell, Bill Workman.

President Carter called the meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.

Compton presented the Treasurer's report, but no action was taken due to the lack of a quorum

Except for some noise and food-serving problems resulting from the long line at the bar (because there was only one bartender), the review of the Annual Awards competition was mostly favorable. Carter pointed out that the Awards program was over by 9:35 p.m. Despite the slow service and noise form a fifth-grade graduation next door, the Board expressed hope that these problems can be addressed and next year's event can again be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Foster City. Darryl will work with Aimee Lewis to see if we can be reimbursed for the five meals that were never served.

Several ideas were advanced for improving the program. Compton suggested that awards be announced by category, rather than by division. That way, the entire room will be continuously involved in the awards. Carter, the MC, also suggested that past years' monologue script be abandoned in favor of a looser, screen-oriented format.

It was also advanced that it should not be necessary to remove bylines from entries, as our remote judges don't know local entries.

Referring to the report on entries prepared by Compton, Price praised the board for a "great achievement" by attracting a greater number of entries in each of the past few years. Compton reported that a new source for plaques reduced the cost of plaques from about $4,000 in the past to about $1,500 this year, a great savings for the PPC.

Carter reported that, at the awards dinner, three members expressed interest in joining the PPC board. They are long-time radio industry executive Cleveland, a former PPC president; Jamie Cassini of the Examiner; and Jay Thorwaldson of the Palo Alto Weekly. The board will consider new board members at its next meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the San Mateo Daily News. There will be no board meeting in July.

Tentative date for the annual PPC picnic was set for Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Belmont home of Micki Carter and Mike Venturino.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

Thursday, June 2, 2005

2005 Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards

FOSTER CITY — Bay Area print journalists, photographers, radio and television personnel and public relations professionals were presented with 207 awards of excellence in 84 categories at the Peninsula Press Club's 28th annual Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards dinner here tonight.

The Peninsula Press Club's annual Professional Journalism Awards Competition dinner was held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Foster City.

The winners were selected from 557 entries from media professionals in the 11 Greater Bay Area counties. Competition was for work done in 2004. Entries were judged by the Florida Press Club, The Press Club of Cleveland, Press Club of Houston, Press Club of New Orleans, San Diego Press Club and the Press Club of Southeast Texas. A group of Texas photographers judged the photo entries coordinated by Paul Sakuma of the Associated Press.

Four $1,000 Scholarships were presented in the name of San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen. The recipients were: Koren Temple, Santa Clara University; Aynsley Karps, Mountain View High School, Mountain View, CA; Alexis Salas, Jefferson High School, Daly City, CA; and Victoria Tang, Irvington High School, Fremont, CA

The assembly reflected on the loss ob Bay Area journalists this past year: Steve Davis, Beverly Kees, Susan Caldwell, Merv Harris and Harry Jupiter. A one-time award of $500 in memory of photographer Susan Caldwell was awarded to Sara Wolfram from San Francisco State University

The complete list of winners follows:


NEWSPAPERS - Dailies over 75,000 circulation (Division A)


Editorial
Editorial
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Exploited, then evicted." John Diaz
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "S.J. Unified's new chief launches a wave of new ideas." John Fensterwald
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "The public employee fantasyland." Phil Yost

Columns-News/Political
First Place: The Press Democrat "Columns by Ann DuBay." Ann DuBay
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Columns by Joan Ryan." Joan Ryan
Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat "Columns by Paul Gullixson." Paul Gullixson

Columns-Feature
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Columns by Debra J. Saunders." Debra J. Saunders

Columns-Sports
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Columns by Gwen Knapp." Gwen Knapp

Breaking News
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Guilty." Stacy Finz, Diana Walsh, Kelly St. John
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "The Peterson Verdict." Mercury News Staff
Honorable Mention: The Examiner "Local hikers head home." Jamie Casini

News Story
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "High Cost of City Hall." Aaron Davis

Continuing Coverage
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Steroids." Mark Fainaru-Wada, Lance Williams
Second Place: The Examiner "Gangs of North Amphlett." Kate Williamson
Honorable Mention: The Examiner "Amber Frey." Jamie Casini

Series
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Operation Lion Heart." Meredith May
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "Cracking the Code:Genetics Reshapes Medicine." April Lynch
Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat "Global Shift." Erin Allday, Mary Fricker, Jeremy Hay, Bleys W. Rose
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "California Youth Prisons:Where Hope is Locked Away." Karen De Sa, Brandon Bailey

Feature Story of Light Nature
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Happy endings -- and beginnings." Marianne Costantinou
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "For Smooth Skin, the Cutting Edge is Foreskin." Bruce Newman
Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat "Big heart of an evolving community." John Beck

Feature Story of Serious Nature
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "Left with Memories." Julia Prodis Sulek
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "A Will to Give." Becky Hall, Mark Emmons
Honorable Mention: San Francisco Chronicle "Memories of Joel fade slowly." Patricia Yollin

Analysis
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "The battle over same-sex marriage." Carolyn Lochhead
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "Hazy Border of Reality, Fantasy is Arena for Game-Violence Debate." Dean Takahashi

Technology Story
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "Am I Famous Yet?." K. Oanh Ha
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Trek Tech." Benny Evangelista

Business Story
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Looking Offshore." David Lazarus
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "Google Goes for It." Michael Bazeley

Entertainment Review
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "'The Valley' Captures the Banality of Porn." Jack Fischer
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "'Arrested' is the next 'Seinfeld'" Tim Goodman

Specialty Story
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "Thomas Keller's Laundry Cycles." Carolyn Jung
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "Hope Restored -- The California Comes Full Circle." Richard Scheinin
Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat "Purist finds his calling in cult cab." Virginie Boone

Sports Story
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "How Balco built the world's fastest man." Elliott Almond, Mark Emmons, Pete Carey
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "700!." Henry Schulman
Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat "Steroids blamed in suicide of ex-Casa Grande star." Ralph Leef

Sports Game Story
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "Finally, Freedom to Run." Ann Killion
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Giants bitten by another double play." Henry Schulman

Page Design
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Datebook: Being Spider-Man is no easy job. But the new film is seamless." Elizabeth Burr
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Olives." Ellie Winter, Hulda Nelson, Tom Murray, Craig Lee
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "Bonds' 700th Home Run." Chuck Burke, Kevin Wendt

Headline
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Tame that Troon: a mighty wind." Mike Wolcott
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Golden Gate's ferry-tale ending." Jennifer Thelen
Honorable Mention: San Francisco Chronicle "Mustang sallies forth." Will Crain

Web Site
First Place: San Jose Mercury News "www.mercurynews.com." Mercury News Staff

NEWSPAPERS - Dailies UNDER 75,000 circulation (Division B)


Editorial
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Some Challenges for Lantos." Terry Winckler
Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Tax alternative is unrealistic proposal." Jon Mays
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "Partisan bickering causes legislative failure." Jon Mays

Columns-News/Political
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Columns by Michelle Durand." Michelle Durand
Second Place: San Mateo Daily News "Political commentary by Bil Paul." Bil Paul
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Political commentary by Diana Diamond." Diana Diamond

Columns-Feature
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Columns by John Horgan." John Horgan
Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Grace Land." Grace S. Kallis
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "Off The Beat." Michelle Durand

Columns-Sports
First Place: Palo Alto Daily News "Columns by Dylan Kruse." Dylan Kruse

Breaking News
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Chaos at the Courthouse." Michelle Durand
Second Place: Los Gatos Daily News "Suspect arrested for killing Jeanine Harms." Christine Lias
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "Crash kills Hillsdale teacher." Yunmi Choi

News Story
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Quiet on a recent night -- too quiet?." Tim Hay
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "Stopping people 'before they fall off the cliff'." Emily Fancher
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Woman killed after judge nixes plea for protection." Richard Cole, Jean Whitney

Continuing Coverage
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Scott Peterson Trial Coverage." Jason Dearen
Second Place: Los Gatos Daily News "Coverage of Judge William Danser trial." Christine Lias
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "The Trial of Eddie Rapoza." Michelle Durand

Series
First Place: San Mateo County Times "The short, sad life of Angelo." Emily Fancher, Amy Yarbrough
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "San Mateo County Goes Back to School." Teresa Mills-Faraudo & Staff
Honorable Mention: Los Gatos Daily News "Elder Abuse in Silicon Valley." Christine Lias

Feature Story of Light Nature
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Exactly where is this in rule book?." Rick Chandler
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "The Last Road Trip." Amelia Hansen
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "Cars as canvas." Dana Yates

Feature Story of Serious Nature
First Place: San Mateo County Times "The Last Ranchers." Amelia Hansen
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "A Heart-Filled Tale." Emily Fancher

Analysis
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Political dissent sparks in Burlingame." Jon Mays
Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "What is the price of history?." Jon Mays

Technology Story
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Phone and Games." Tim Simmers
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "Genentech drugs helping save patients' lives." Tim Simmers

Specialty Story
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "'My favorite movie is steak'." Cheri Lucas

Sports Story
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Breathing easy." Emanuel Lee
Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "'Big Play Eddie' Shatters Adversity." Emanuel Lee
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Oshinowo primed for big year." John Reid

Sports Game Story
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Woodside whips Westmount for title." Emanuel Lee
Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "Burlingame rallies to shock M-A." Nathan Mollat
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Stanford muzzles the Huskies." John Reid

Page Design
First Place: Marin Independent Journal "Built For Style: A Guide to Local Art Deco Architecture" Dennis Bolt
Second Place: Marin Independent Journal "Marin Center." Dennis Bolt
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "New urbanism 8/6/04." Daily Journal Staff

Headline
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "County to PHS: Stay." Jon Mays
Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News "Rocky Rhodes has meltdown." Dylan Kruse
Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal "Alcohol tax on ice." Michelle Durand

Web Site
First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal "www.smdailyjournal.com." Daily Journal Staff
Second Place: San Mateo County Times "www.sanmateocountytimes.com" Patrick Perron

NEWSPAPERS - Non-dailies (Division C)


Editorial
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Time to reassess student testing." Jay Thorwaldson
Second Place: San Francisco Business Times "Highrise housing foes sink low on the Peninsula." Jim Gardner

Columns-News/Political
First Place: Cupertino Courier / Sunnyvale Sun "Columns by Sandy Sims." Sandy Sims
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Columns by Don Kazak." Don Kazak

Columns-Feature
First Place: Almaden Resident "Columns by Gregory Watkins." Gregory Watkins
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Eating Out." Jennifer Aquino
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly "Columns by Jay Thorwaldson." Jay Thorwaldson

Breaking News
First Place: Mountain View Voice "Local Student Killed in Shooting." Julie O'Shea
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Decision to kill lion correct, police say." Palo Alto Weekly Staff

News Story
First Place: Almaden Resident "Gonzales' State of the City speech cost $51,500." Sandy Brundage
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Shock Value." Bill D'Agostino
Honorable Mention: Mountain View Voice "Cops protest phone 'scam'." Julie O'Shea

Continuing Coverage
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Mountain Lion Coverage." Bill D'Agostino, Jocelyn Dong, Jaime Marconette, Don Kazak
Second Place: Saratoga News "Saratoga High cheating incidents." Lisa Toth, My Ngo
Honorable Mention: Almaden Resident "Almaden Youth Association Coverage." Sandy Brundage

Series
First Place: Los Gatos Weekly Times "History of Los Gatos." Dick Sparrer

Feature Story of Light Nature
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Under the spell." Jocelyn Dong
Second Place: Sunnyvale Sun "Masked Crusaders." Jason Goldman-Hall

Feature Story of Serious Nature
First Place: Pacific Sun "Dangerous side effects." Jill Kramer
Second Place: Pacific Sun "Elder Abuse Trial." Jill Kramer
Honorable Mention: Sunnyvale Sun "Counted In." Jason Goldman-Hall

Analysis
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "The price of Palo Alto." Palo Alto Weekly Staff
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Perception or reality?." Bill D'Agostino

Technology Story
First Place: San Francisco Business Times "Arthur Levinson drives Genentech." Daniel S. Levine
Second Place: Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal "ZigBee's web of connected sensors opens new opportunities." Janet Rae-Dupree
Honorable Mention: San Francisco Business Times "Ready, or not?." Daniel S. Levine. Chris Rauber, Lizette Wilson

Business Story
First Place: Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal "Success proves elusive for pizza entrepreneur." Robert J. Mullins
Second Place: San Francisco Business Times "Funding in the gritty zone." Mark Calvey

Entertainment Review
First Place: Mountain View Voice "'Bit' by the laughing bug." Julie O'Shea
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Shrek 2." Susan Tavernetti
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly "Review of "Ray"." Tyler Martin Hanley

Specialty Story
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "The Rx Factor." Jocelyn Dong
Second Place: Campbell Reporter "Sea's Candy." Martin Nobida
Honorable Mention: Pacific Sun "Forever Young." Jill Kramer

Sports Story
First Place: Almaden Resident "Soccer Guru." Gregory Watkins
Second Place: Campbell Reporter "Coach is left wrestling with more than his athletes after being fired." Martin Nobida
Honorable Mention: Los Gatos Weekly Times "Best in the West." Dick Sparrer

Sports Game Story
First Place: The Independent "Eddie is money again for Aragon." Matt Elliser

Page Design
First Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Olympic Dreams." Judith Alderman
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "Rooting out evil at Stanford." Diane Haas
Honorable Mention: Sunnyvale Sun "Gold Mettle." Sandy Sims

Headline
First Place: Los Gatos Weekly Times "Land of Ahhs, Brainforest." Dick Sparrer
Second Place: San Francisco Business Times "Law firms seek piece in Iraq." Steve Symanovich
Honorable Mention: Los Gatos Weekly Times "First graders learning L, 'Omm,' N, O, P." Dick Sparrer

Web Site
First Place: San Francisco Business Times "www.bizjournals.com." Stephen Brown, Patrick Twohy
Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly "www.paloaltoonline.com." Palo Alto Online Staff

EDITORIAL CARTOONS (Division D)


First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Editorial Cartoons." Tom Meyer
Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Bad Reporter." Don Asmussen
Honorable Mention: San Mateo County Times "The President Finally...." Steve Lait

PRINT PHOTOGRAPHY (Division E)


Spot News Photography
First Place: Palo Alto Daily News "Mud Rescue." Tony Avelar
Second Place: The Press Democrat "Geysers fire." Christopher Chung
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "Grieving for a Brother." Pauline Lubens
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Christmas Fire." Tony Avelar

General News Photography
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Remembering." John J. Green
Second Place: San Jose Mercury News "Wedding Waltz." Karen T. Borchers
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "Bringing The War Home." Pauline Lubens
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "Picture This." Pauline Lubens

Feature Photography
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Windshield." Deanne Fitzmaurice
Second Place: The Press Democrat "Dunk Tank." Chad Surmick
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "Big Wheel." Kainaz Amaria
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "When Pigs Fly." Tony Avelar

Sports Action Photography
First Place: San Mateo County Times "Dancing with the Bulls." John J. Green
Second Place: The Press Democrat "Monster Meltdown." Christopher Chung
Honorable Mention: Santa Cruz Sentinel "Skimbash." Shmuel Thaler
Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News "And They're Off." Tony Avelar

Sports Feature Photography
First Place: Associated Press "Cal Wins Big Game." Paul Sakuma
Second Place: Associated Press "Raiders QB injured & out for season." Paul Sakuma
Honorable Mention: San Mateo County Times "Cowboy Preacher." John J. Green

Photo Series or Picture Story
First Place: San Francisco Chronicle "Lion Heart." Deanne Fitzmaurice
Second Place: The Press Democrat "Outsourcing the Local Economy." John Burgess
Honorable Mention: San Mateo County Times "Last Ranchers." John J. Green
Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News "Iraq: Transition Into Chaos." Pauline Lubens

TELEVISION (Division F)


Breaking News
First Place: KTVU FOX 2 "Rescued." Sara Sidner, Randee Deason, Jay Martinez
Second Place: KTVU FOX 2 "Happy Ending." Robert Handa

Feature Story of Light Nature
First Place: KNTV NBC 11 "In Wine Country Composite." Mary Orlin, Carrie Cain, Mark Oltz, Mary Babbitt
Second Place: KFTY 50 "Pumpkin Carver." Chris Bollini
Honorable Mention: KFTY 50 "Spend Away All." Ed Beebout, Chris Bollini

Feature Story of Serious Nature
First Place: KPIX CBS 5 "Consumer Watch: Prescription Drugs." Jeanette Pavini, Stephanie Danford, Rick Villaroman
Second Place: KPIX CBS 5 "Consumer Watch: Autos For AIDS." Jeanette Pavini, Ed Nieto
Honorable Mention: KTVU FOX 2 "Bay Area Expatriates." Mark Curtis, Roland DeWolk, John MacKenzie, Joe Orlando

Public Affairs Program
First Place: KPIX CBS 5 "The Real Deal." Jeanette Pavini. Ed Nieto, Tim Hazen
Second Place: KPIX CBS 5 "Journey of Purpose: AIDS/Lifecycle 3." Jackie Wright, Jerry Cahill, Riki Raffner

Interview or Talk Show
First Place: KPIX CBS 5 "Real Deal-Consumer Watch 6/19/04." Jeanette Pavini. Ed Nieto, Tim Hazen
Second Place: KTVU FOX 2 "Missing Boy Miracle." Mark Curtis, Rosemarie Schwarz, Alicia Dlugosh, Sid Farhang

Special Programming
First Place: KPIX CBS 5 "Next of Kin." Dan Rosenheim, Mia Zuckerkandel
Second Place: KTVU FOX 2 "25th Annual Great American Toy Test." Tom Vacar, Sharon Navratil,
Jim Haman, Don McCuaig, Steve Shlisky

Documentary
First Place: KRON 4 "Where the Fault Lies." Brian Hackney, Craig Franklin, Jim Joy
Second Place: KCSM-TV "The Jeeter Bug: Mission Over Iwo Jima." Dante Betteo, Josh Springer, John Hall, Grace Provenzano
Honorable Mention: KCSM-TV "Voices of CSM." Dante Betteo, Josh Springer, John Hall, Rene Renard

Sports Story
First Place: KNTV NBC 11 "In Wine Country: Sports Composite." Mary Orlin, Carrie Cain, Mark Oltz, Mary Babbitt
Second Place: KDTV Univision 14 "Medalla Al Merito." Tony Lopez, Santiago Vides

Photographer
First Place: KFTY 50 "Bollini Composite." Chris Bollini
Second Place: KNTV NBC 11 "In Wine Country Composite." Mark Oltz

Editing
First Place: KFTY 50 "Bollini Composite." Chris Bollini
Second Place: KNTV NBC 11 "In Wine Country Composite." Mark Oltz

RADIO (Division G)


Breaking News
First Place: KCBS Radio "Pipeline Fire." KCBS News Team

Feature Story of Light Nature
First Place: KCBS Radio "Prom Night." Matt Bigler
Second Place: KQED Public Radio "My Seat at the Table." Sarah Varney
Honorable Mention: KQED Public Radio "Super Commuters." Jason Margolis

Feature Story of Serious Nature
First Place: KQED Public Radio "Interpreting Manzanar." Molly Peterson, Ingrid Becker
Second Place: KQED Public Radio "Berkeley Considers Prostitution." Sarah Varney
Honorable Mention: KCBS Radio "Boeddeker Park." Doug Sovern

Special Programming
First Place: KCBS Radio "Innocence for Sale." Holly Quan

Documentary
First Place: KCBS Radio "Battle Scars." Doug Sovern

Sports Story
First Place: KCBS Radio "Tour de France." Doug Sovern

Use of Sound
First Place: KCBS Radio "Boeddeker Park." Doug Sovern


MAGAZINES / TRADE PUBLICATIONS (Division H)


News Story
First Place: San Jose Magazine "The San Jose that Might Have Been." Tom McHenry, Jenny Desai
Second Place: Silicon Valley Magazine "How MP3 Technology is changing an Industry." Peter Crane
Honorable Mention: Silicon Valley Magazine "Gene Therapy." Peter Crane

Review/Column
First Place: San Jose Magazine "Off the Wall." Murry Frymer

Page Design
First Place: Silicon Valley Magazine "Harmony and Balance: Michael Cutlip." Daniel Huenergardt, Pete Constant
Second Place: San Jose Magazine "Radio Daze." Jerome Callens
Honorable Mention: San Jose Magazine "How 'bout those A's." Jerome Callens

SCHOLARSHIPS

Herb Caen $1,000 College Scholarship
Koren Temple, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA

Herb Caen $1,000 High School Scholarships
Aynsley Karps, Mountain View High School, Mountain View, CA
Alexis Salas, Jefferson High School, Daly City, CA
Victoria Tang, Irvington High School, Fremont, CA

Susan Caldwell $500 Photography Scholarship
Sara Wolfram, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

Thursday, May 19, 2005

Winners announced in high school contest

For the second year in a row, the Burlingame B, the student newspaper at Burlingame High School, took first-place honors in General Excellence. The B and its staff members also won a total of five awards in the 2004-2005 Peninsula Press Club High School Journalism Awards Competition.

Palo Alto High School's Campanile newspaper and Paly Voice Web site were honored with nine awards.

The contest is sponsored by the Peninsula Press Club, Hillsdale Shopping Center and the journalism program at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont. Awards were presented at a reception May 18 in Ralston Hall on the Belmont campus of NDNU.

Nine publications from eight high schools from Daly City to Palo Alto provided 222 entries for the competition which covered April 1, 2004, through March 31, 2005. Professional journalists and members of the Press Club served as judges for the contest.

Here's a complete list of the winners:

General Excellence
First: Burlingame High School B;
Second: Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Eastside College Prep Panther;
Honorable Mention: Mills High School Thunderbolt.

Layout & Design
First: Burlingame High School B;
Second: Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Mills High School Thunderbolt.
HM: Eastside College Prep Panther.

News Story
First: Alicia Rovai-Cruz, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Alex Montalvo, Burlingame High School B;
Third: Jonathan Steinman, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
HM: Danny Snyder, Palo Alto High School Campanile.

Feature Story
First: Kim Segall, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Second: Anjali Albuquerque, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Third: Alex Montalvo, Burlingame High School B;
HM: Tim Chang, Palo Alto High School Campanile.

Editorial
First: Alexis Salas, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Karishma Oza, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Third: Stephanie Chan, Mills High School Thunderbolt;
HM: Soumya Sringesh, Palo Alto High School Campanile;

Sports Story
First: Jonathan Steinman, Palo Alto High School Campanile;
Second: David Tufo, Burlingame High School B;
Third: Vallery Armas, Mills High School Thunderbolt;
HM: Thomas O'Connell and Laura Mitchell, Palo Alto High School's Paly Voice.

News Photo
First: Michaelle Fernandez; Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Second: Bianca Padilla, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom;
Third: Nicole Faumuina, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom.

Feature Photo
First: Robin McNulty, Palo Alto High School's Paly Voice;
Second: Michaelle Fernandez, Jefferson High School Tom-Tom.

Sports Photo
First: Jose Ibarra, Eastside College Prep Panther;
Second: Rachel Altmaier, Pinewood School Panther Prints;
Third: Rachel Altmaier, Pinewood School Panther Prints;
HM: Luis A. Torres, Eastside College Prep Panther.

Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Merc reports huge circulation decline

Editor & Publisher Magazine

By Jennifer Saba

NEW YORK -- The San Jose Mercury News reported its spring circulation numbers Monday, two weeks after most other daily newspapers did, and the filing shows that the Knight Ridder paper experienced one of the biggest circ drops in the industry. For the six-month period ending March 2005, daily circ at the Mercury News declined 7.1%, or 19,890, to 259,649 copies. Sunday circ fell 9.9%, or 30,793, to 277,632 copies.

The California paper did not file its Publishers Statement on time, missing the Audit Bureau of Circulations' FAS-FAX report released May 3. A spokesperson for Knight Ridder previously said that the Mercury News was handling its yearly audit with the organization at the same time their six-month Publishers Statement was due, hence the delay. (Later Tuesday, a Mercury News official explained that the drops were caused by reductions in other-paid circulation. See article here.)

The Mercury News' numbers were reported in ABC's supplemental Fas-Fax, released Monday. This report provides circulation data on publications that filed their Publisher's Statements after the deadline for the regular FAS-FAX. The supplement also contains corrections to data shown in the original report.

Other papers to make an appearance on the supplemental report: The Boston Globe, which made a minor adjustment to its weekday Friday average by exactly one copy, from 434,330 to 434,329. The paper experienced other changes as well, including a decrease of 983 copies made to its Saturday numbers, to 178,233. The change stems from the more-than-50% paid column, which declined by 983 copies on the same day to 169,009.

The Oregonian in Portland shifted some of its circulation as well. In the supplemental FAS-FAX, the paper made dramatic gains in the more-than-50% paid category. In that column, Monday through Friday increased by 44,799 copies, to 315,717 (wiping out the entire 25%-to-50%-paid column). Sunday showed similar gains in that category.

Mostly small to medium-sized papers also showed up in the 19 page report. The Morning Call in Allentown, Pa., experienced decreases in both daily and Sunday circ, down 3.3% and 4.7% respectively. The Enid News & Eagle in Oklahoma also slipped in daily 4.9% and Sunday 4.7%.

In Colorado, the Fort Collins Coloradoan experienced minor dips. The Pantagraph in Bloomington, Ill., reported daily declines of 1.6% to 47,163, as Sunday decreased 2.5% to 49,329.

The Advocate in Baton Rouge, La., slipped slightly daily but Sunday showed small gains at 0.3% to 121,931.



Jennifer Saba is an associate editor at E&P.
Mercury News reports huge circulation losses
The San Jose Mercury News reported its spring circulation numbers Monday, two weeks after most other daily newspapers did, and the filing shows that the Knight Ridder paper experienced one of the biggest circ drops in the industry. For the six-month period ending March 2005, daily circ at the Mercury News declined 7.1%, or 19,890, to 259,649 copies. Sunday circ fell 9.9%, or 30,793, to 277,632 copies.

Sunday, May 15, 2005

May 2005 Press Club board minutes

At the San Mateo Daily News

Board Members Present: Micki Carter, John Kane, Dave Price
Also Present: PPC Executive Director Darryl Compton, Member Peter Cleveland
Absent: Aimee Lewis, Jon Mays, Ed Remitz, Jack Russell, Bill Workman.

President Carter called the meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.

Compton presented the Treasurer's report, but no action was taken due to the lack of a quorum

Except for some noise and food-serving problems resulting from the long line at the bar (because there was only one bartender), the review of the Annual Awards competition was mostly favorable. Carter pointed out that the Awards program was over by 9:35 p.m. Despite the slow service and noise form a fifth-grade graduation next door, the Board expressed hope that these problems can be addressed and next year's event can again be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Foster City. Darryl will work with Aimee Lewis to see if we can be reimbursed for the five meals that were never served.

Several ideas were advanced for improving the program. Compton suggested that awards be announced by category, rather than by division. That way, the entire room will be continuously involved in the awards. Carter, the MC, also suggested that past years' monologue script be abandoned in favor of a looser, screen-oriented format.

It was also advanced that it should not be necessary to remove bylines from entries, as our remote judges don't know local entries.

Referring to the report on entries prepared by Compton, Price praised the board for a "great achievement" by attracting a greater number of entries in each of the past few years. Compton reported that a new source for plaques reduced the cost of plaques from about $4,000 in the past to about $1,500 this year, a great savings for the PPC.

Carter reported that, at the awards dinner, three members expressed interest in joining the PPC board. They are long-time radio industry executive Cleveland, a former PPC president; Jamie Cassini of the Examiner; and Jay Thorwaldson of the Palo Alto Weekly. The board will consider new board members at its next meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 10, at the San Mateo Daily News. There will be no board meeting in July.

Tentative date for the annual PPC picnic was set for Sunday, Sept. 18, at the Belmont home of Micki Carter and Mike Venturino.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

Wednesday, May 4, 2005

Unflattering profile of Chron publisher

Tommy Craggs, writing for the SF Weekly, says that the new publisher of the SF Chron has been cast as a villain, but may be exactly what the Hearst Corp. needs to defeat the dark forces of the new economy.
    Since taking over in January, Vega has methodically gone about charming the better part of a jittery Chronicle. He estimates he has met face to face with at least 500 employees, mostly in small groups in his conference room, but also on smoke breaks and walks through the building. One of his first moves was to throw open the doors inside the Chronicle, where in the past you'd need a swipe key to get from office to office. "We're a newspaper," Vega says. "We're supposed to be open to the public, and we weren't even open to ourselves. I think people appreciate the fact that there's a little more of an open society here than there was."

Friday, April 22, 2005

Game not the same after loss of Merv Harris

By the San Mateo County Times

SAN MATEO -- Somewhere, Merv Harris was smiling.

It was that kind of a day at College of San Mateo on Thursday. Warm, and clear with a hint of drama in the air. San Mateo and Cabrillo were locked in a 5-5 Coast Conference baseball contest. Henry Wrigley, a freshman from Burlingame High, was at the plate with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning. There were two strikes.

Wrigley then deposited the next pitch beyond the fence in left field, a line drive that left no doubt. The walk-off home run gave the Bulldogs a 6-5 victory, and Wrigley was mobbed at the plate as a handful of fans celebrated behind the backstop. But one familiar face was missing.

Longtime reporter Merv Harris [pictured], who had covered the local sports scene seemingly since the invention of newsprint, was conspicuous in his absence. Harris, who had covered the Bulldogs for the San Francisco Examiner and San Mateo County Times since the 1970s, passed away at a South San Francisco hospital on Monday of complications from diabetes and other ailments.

"That was a game that Merv would have loved," said CSM assistant Lenny Vagt, a friend of Harris' for more than 20 years. "A walk-off homer, he would have been really excited. He loved Wrigley. He was always talking about him."

That was the thing about Merv. He was beloved and respected by the coaches and players he covered because his style resonated with them. They sensed his passion. Merv loved a good ballgame, but he also always kept the big picture close to his heart: People are moreimportant than things.

"We all feel that we lost a part of our family," San Mateo coach Doug Williams said. "Merv called me on Sunday from the hospital, explaining why he wasn't at our game the previous day. He was upbeat and real positive, expecting to come back soon. That's what I'll remember most about him, his enthusiasm. San Mateo County owes him a big thank you."

Merv was a familiar presence to Wrigley as well, going back to his high school career at Burlingame.

"It's really weird not having him around," Wrigley said. "I didn't know him that well, but I saw him a lot, and he'd always smile and wave and be happy to see us. He flat out loved being here. I was shocked when he passed."

CSM football coach Larry Owens met Harris when Owens was coaching at Woodside High in the early 1980s.

"His passing is not going to really sink for some until it's time for their sport to roll around," Owens said. "Fall will get here, and kids are going to really miss him. You know, we didn't always see eye-to-eye on some things. But he did his job professionally, and he enjoyed doing it. We can all learn a lesson from that."

CSM's baseball team is reflecting on that now.

"You know, my grandfather passed away suddenly, kind of out of the blue," Wrigley said. "In a way that makes it easier to deal with. He led a good, prosperous life, and you take comfort in that."

Williams would agree.

"When Henry hit that homer, I know Merv was smiling, looking down," Williams said. "We're certainly going to miss him."

-One day in March, following a game at CSM, Merv was backing up his car in the parking lot and ran into the car behind him -- which happened to belong to one of the umpires. The umpire in question arrived just in time to see the collision, and began inspecting the damage (a bent license plate). Merv, not realizing he had hit the vehicle (he's the type of person who would have stopped if he had), sped off. The umpire, seeing me a few yards away, called out frantically: "Hey, who was that guy? Did you see that?"

As a former youth baseball coach, I had always dreamed of this opportunity. And so I got to say what I'd always wanted to say to an umpire: "Nope. Didn't see a thing."

-Coaches, administrators, players, friends and readers are encouraged to share their stories, memories and thoughts of Merv Harris for future publication. Contact the County Times by e-mail at rchandler@sanmateocountytimes.com, or by phone at (650) 348-4348.

Thursday, April 21, 2005

Game not the same after loss of Merv Harris

The San Mateo County Times reports the death of longtime sports writer Merv Harris, who covered the local sports scene for the San Francisco Examiner and the San Mateo Times for decades.

Wednesday, April 20, 2005

April 2005 Press Club board minutes

Minutes of the April 20 meeting of the Board of Directors

Present: Michelle Carter, John Kane, Jack Russell, Darryl Compton, Dave Price, Jon Mays, Bill Workman.

Absent: Aimee Lewis, Ed Remitz


President Micki Carter called the meeting to order at 6:20 p.m.

Minutes of the previous meeting and the treasurer's report were approved.


Old business:

28th Annual Awards Competition. It was noted that the contest entries were being judged by six different clubs across the country. The contest results will return May 1 and the invitations will be mailed out soon after, Compton reported.

High school contest judging. Entries are up and the judging is to completed April 25.

Susan Caldwell memorial scholarship. It was decided that the Press Club will give the winner $500.

SAMCAR scholarship. There is a question about the $1,500 attached to the scholarship because of instability at SAMCAR. Carter will call representative for more details.


New business:

Jim Monroe's widow wants a newsletter sent to her. The board agreed to it.

There was some discussion of having some presentation or ceremony at the annual awards banquet for a number of local journalists who died this year.

The next newsletter will come out the second week of May, Carter reported. Carter also said the award banquet arrangements were once again organized by Lewis and there will be no increase in the rate.


The meeting was adjourned at 7 p.m.

Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Bay Area becomes incubator for free daily newspapers

April 19, 2005

KGO-TV Channel 7

How do you get your news fix? If you said the Internet you're not alone. But now the Bay Area has become an incubator for the newspaper of the future. They're free, popping up everywhere, and aimed at attracting young eyeballs. So what's behind the trend?

Newspapers in America are institutions, most dating back over 100 years. But readers don't have to wait for the presses to crank out a paper to get their news.

Television, cable and satellite and the Internet have spawned a wide range of 24 hour news sources.

Connie Nguyen gets her news online.

Connie Nguyen, Internet news consumer: "It's faster, it's more available. I think you're too busy in the morning to drop a newspaper and read it."

Nguyen and others in their 20's and 30's are new targets for the newspaper industry. And in the Bay Area, where they don't read mainstream papers, free daily papers are trying to entice them.

Scott McKibben, San Francisco Examiner publisher: "We know that this generation feels that they should not have to pay for their news, so the free concept, the compact size, the tabloid ... we're a smaller newspaper, they can read it quicker, the stories are shorter."

Traditional newspapers may have fostered the free news model by making their content free online.

For example, more people read the New York Times on the web each day than subscribe to the paper.

Free daily papers have popped up in Chicago, Washington D.C. and several other cities.

The Palo Alto Daily News, along with four other free Peninsula papers, was recently purchased by Knight Ridder, the owner of the San Jose Mercury News.

William Woo, a visiting professor at Stanford, was the long-time editor of the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

He believes it's content that will win readers, young and old. And young readers won't abandon the Internet for newspapers.

William Woo, former newspaper editor: "They are going to be multimedia consumers through their life, and I think if you expect them to move away from their broad media base and substitute newspapers for it, it's going to be a long hard night for that to happen."

Sold out newspaper racks -- that's exactly what newspaper publishers want to see. But that's not always the case. Change is coming to the newspaper industry, but that change is going to be slow.

Bay Area becomes incubator for free dailies

KGO ABC 7 reports that the Bay Area has become "an incubator for the newspaper of the future [free dailies] They're free, popping up everywhere, and aimed at attracting young eyeballs."

Thursday, April 14, 2005

Press Democrat photo editor Metzger dies

Santa Rosa Press Democrat photo editor John Metzge suffered a heart attack and died Wednesday while enjoying a family reunion in Hawaii, the paper reported today. Metzger, 56, and his wife, Becca, were on Oahu visiting the elder of their two sons, John Jr., an Army specialist who only recently returned to American soil after serving a year in Afghanistan.
    Metzger joined The Press Democrat as director of photography in 1993. Among his charges was staff photographer Annie Wells, whose photos of Santa Rosa firefighters' rescue of a girl caught in a raging creek in 1996 won a Pulitzer Prize. Wells, now a photographer with the Los Angeles Times, said Wednesday, "No one I've worked with had the vision of what a photographer brings to the table that John did. "Had I not worked with him, I wouldn't be half the photographer I am today," she said.

Friday, March 18, 2005

KGO's Steve Davis dies of cancer

Steve Davis, a reporter and anchor at KGO from 1971 to 1991, has died from cancer. KGO says, "He reported extensively on the SLA, the group that kidnapped Patty Hearst. He also investigated Jim Jones and the People's Temple in San Francisco well before hundreds of people died in the suicide and murder in Guyana. His interview with the cult's former lawyer was a grim warning of what was to come ... Steve traveled to Mount Saint Helens to experience the area near the volcano's crater first hand. In 1991, he was part of the team that brought viewers the devastating news of the Oakland firestorm."

Wednesday, March 9, 2005

March 2005 Press Club board minutes

PRESENT: Michelle Carter, John Kane, Ed Remitz, Jack Russell, Darryl Compton.

ABSENT: Jon Mays and Bill Workman, illnesses; Aimee Lewis, Dave Price

President Micki Carter called meeting to order at 6:20 p.m. She announced that Justin Nyberg has resigned as a member of the board because he has moved to New Mexico to do freelance writing. The board unnaimously expressed its thanks and appreciation for Justin's contributions as a member of the board.

The board also extended congratulations to President Carter, adviser to the staff of the Notre Dame De Namur University newspaper, The Argonaut, which took first place in the non-daily category of the California Collegiate Media Association and fourth place among 144 entries in the nationwide Associated Collegiate Press competition.

Minutes of the previous meeting and the treasurer's report were approved.

It was also moved and seconded that Darryl move the $10,194 that we have at United American Bank and merge it with the $6,941 in our 501(c)3, thereby boosting our scholarship fund to $17,000, and investing it in a CD for a better interest rate.Board members were polled via email for their votes on this matter and the motion passed unanimously.

Darryl presented a positive report on the PPC Professional Journalism awads competition, which showed a record 541 entries with increases in most categories. The previous record was 462 entries for last year's competition.

It was noted that the PPC is becoming increasingly active in helping to judge journalism competition for other U.S. Press clubs. PPC members presently are judging competition from the press clubs of Cleveland and Southeast Texas. It was agreed to identify our organization as the San Francisco Peninsula Press Club in future correspondence with other press clubs.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:05 p.m.

Submitted by John Kane, acting secretary.

Monday, February 21, 2005

Ch. 11 chief plans to build a powerhouse

Linda Sullivan, the new head of Channel 11 KNTV, says: “Here, I'm building something instead of shoring up an operation.” A veteran of stations such as NBC O&O WRC in Washington and WJAR Providence, R.I., Sullivan's two biggest tasks are building a new structure to house Channel 11 and Telemundo 48, and getting a new transmitter on the air on San Bruno Mountain.

Tuesday, February 15, 2005

Knight Ridder to buy Daily News

Knight Ridder, the nation's second-largest newspaper publisher, today (Feb. 15) purchased the Daily News Group of newspapers including the Palo Alto Daily News, San Mateo Daily News, Los Gatos Daily News, Redwood City Daily News and Burlingame Daily News.

Publishers Dave Price (left) and Jim Pavelich will continue to oversee the Daily News for Knight Ridder.

Price and Pavelich predict the acquisition will benefit readers of the Daily News, which was founded nine years ago.

"We see this as a win-win," said Pavelich. "Knight Ridder's resources will help us improve our news reporting and strengthen our customer relationships."

"They came to us, and before selling, we researched what they had one in other cities," said Price. "Every time they have acquired a newspaper, that paper improved in every area, from news to circulation, from advertising to printing. We're happy to be working with them."

The Daily News has helped develop the format of a free daily newspaper, a concept that has become increasingly popular in the newspaper industry in the past few years. Free dailies have opened in New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C. and Dallas as well as many smaller towns.

By acquiring the Daily News, Knight Ridder has the people who have been behind the nation's most successful free newspapers in terms of journalism and profitability.

The Daily News will continue to operate from its current offices in Palo Alto, San Mateo and Los Gatos.

The Palo Alto Daily News was founded Dec. 7, 1995 by Dave Danforth, Jim Pavelich and Dave Price, and the first issue was eight pages with a circulation of 3,000. The three owners hit the streets of Palo Alto and handed out the paper to anyone who would take a copy.

Within days, the paper was attracting readers and advertisers, and was in the black within 10 months.

In 2000, the Daily News expanded into San Mateo, Burlingame and Redwood City with daily newspapers for each of those cities. Initially those newspapers were headquartered in the basement of Dave Price's home in San Mateo County, but the Daily News soon opened an office on El Camino Real in San Mateo.

In 2002, the Daily News expanded again by launching a Los Gatos newspaper. Like the other editions of the Daily News, it began with eight pages. It has now grown to between 24 and 56 pages per day.

Along the way, the Daily News has picked up numerous state and regional awards, including 21 Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards from the Peninsula Press Club last year alone. For the past two years, Price was the California Newspaper Publishers Association's first-place winner for editorial writing among daily newspapers between 25,001 and 75,000 in circulation.

Wednesday, February 9, 2005

February 2005 Press Club board minutes

Minutes of the Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors meeting on Feb. 9, 2005 at the San Mateo Daily News.

Meeting commenced at 6:20 p.m.

Directors present: Micki Carter, Jack Russell, John Kane, Ed Remitz, Bill Workman and Jon Mays. Also present, Executive Director Darryl Compton. Absent: Justin Nyberg, Dave Price and Aimee Lewis.

New business:

• Susan Caldwell memorial. The board decided to honor a woman in print photojournalism with a PPC scholarship in memory of Examiner/Independent photographer Susan Caldwell, who was killed in a recent car crash. The Press Club will assume the responsibility of "filling out" the fund for the scholarship, if necessary, to bring it up to $500 after SFBAPPA has the first $500 for its scholarship. The club also agreed to invite Susan's family to the award dinner this year and to pay for it.

• Sunshine Week. Carter mentioned Sunshine Week sponsored by the American Society of Newspaper Editors is coming March 13 to March 19. The society is asking editors to do what they can to promote the week, which seeks to promote the importance of government access.

• High school journalism contest. The board agreed to exclude magazines from the general excellence category.

Treasurer's report:

• The treasury was reported by Compton to be sound. Workman made a motion to approve the report and Russell seconded the motion which passed unanimously.

Old business:

What does published mean? The board decided a PPC member who lives in the Bay Area can submit work that appeared in a publication outside of the area.

New business:

• Status report on Board member Nyberg. It was reported that Nyberg no longer is a full-time employee at the Examiner.

• College scholarship. Deadline is April 1.

• New awards. Remitz displayed a new type of physical award to be given out. Compton said he will call the company to see if the PPC will use it. The awards are approximately $10 each and could save the board money.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:06 p.m.

Next meeting is scheduled for March 9 at 6:15 p.m.

Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Monday, January 31, 2005

Photojournalist dies in crash
By Millicent Mayfield
Staff Writer

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO -- A van crossing into oncoming traffic caused a head-on collision Sunday afternoon that killed Examiner photographer Susan Caldwell and her 14-year-old daughter, Nina Garrison.

Although witness accounts vary, at around 2 p.m. a Honda van traveling southbound on Bayshore Boulevard near Oyster Point Boulevard crossed a double-barrier line and collided head-on with Caldwell's sedan, police said.

"This accident occurred so quickly and was so violent that it's no wonder that no one can agree on what exactly they saw," said South City police Sgt. Bill Carter.

According to police and fire officials, Caldwell was killed instantly. Garrison sustained massive injuries and later died at San Francisco General Hospital. The male driver of the van is in critical condition at SFGH.

It took about 45 minutes to retrieve all three victims from their mangled cars using the jaws of life.

"It was a very difficult extraction," said Jim Selvitella, battalion chief with the South San Francisco Fire Department. "It was a very traumatic call for all responders. Some of them will never see another accident like that in their entire careers."

The name of the driver of the van was not released at press time and it is unclear whether alcohol or drugs were a factor in the accident.

"There's very little that we can do to conduct that investigation until he's stable," Carter said. Police said traffic was closed along Bayshore Boulevard for about four and a half hours.

Caldwell, who worked with the Examiner and Independent newspapers for about 16 years, was on her way to the Cow Palace to take pictures of the Golden Gate Kennell Club dog show. Her daughter accompanied her because their cat had died a few weeks earlier and they were considering replacing the pet with a dog.

Photojournalist Susan Caldwell dies in accident

By Millicent Mayfield
Examiner Staff Writer

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO -- A van crossing into oncoming traffic caused a head-on collision Sunday afternoon that killed Examiner photographer Susan Caldwell and her 14-year-old daughter, Nina Garrison.

Although witness accounts vary, at around 2 p.m. a Honda van traveling southbound on Bayshore Boulevard near Oyster Point Boulevard crossed a double-barrier line and collided head-on with Caldwell's sedan, police said.

"This accident occurred so quickly and was so violent that it's no wonder that no one can agree on what exactly they saw," said South City police Sgt. Bill Carter.

According to police and fire officials, Caldwell was killed instantly. Garrison sustained massive injuries and later died at San Francisco General Hospital. The male driver of the van is in critical condition at SFGH.

It took about 45 minutes to retrieve all three victims from their mangled cars using the jaws of life.

"It was a very difficult extraction," said Jim Selvitella, battalion chief with the South San Francisco Fire Department. "It was a very traumatic call for all responders. Some of them will never see another accident like that in their entire careers."

The name of the driver of the van was not released at press time and it is unclear whether alcohol or drugs were a factor in the accident.

"There's very little that we can do to conduct that investigation until he's stable," Carter said. Police said traffic was closed along Bayshore Boulevard for about four and a half hours.

Caldwell, who worked with the Examiner and Independent newspapers for about 16 years, was on her way to the Cow Palace to take pictures of the Golden Gate Kennell Club dog show. Her daughter accompanied her because their cat had died a few weeks earlier and they were considering replacing the pet with a dog.

The Susan Caldwell Memorial Scholarship has been started to benefit young photojournalists. Examiner/Independent Photographer Caldwell and her daughter, Nina Garrison, were killed Jan. 30. A memorial was held Feb. 4. The family requests in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to:
"Susan Caldwell Memorial Scholarship Fund"
c/o U.S. Bank
attn: Teresa Adam
50 North Cabrillo Highway
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019

Thursday, January 13, 2005

January 2005 Press Club board minutes

Minutes of the Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors meeting on Jan. 12, 2005 at the San Mateo Daily News.

Meeting commenced at 6:26 p.m.

Directors present: Micki Carter, Jack Russell, John Kane, Ed Remitz and Jon Mays. Also present, Executive Director Darryl Compton and Paul Sakuma.

Absent: Justin Nyberg, Dave Price, Bill Workman and Aimee Lewis. Nyberg called in twice.


Correspondence received.

The board received a hand-delivered letter from club member Brian Bothun admonishing it for allowing the meeting between the press and members of the county's leadership to be off-the-record and closed to the public. Carter said she will respond to the letter.


Treasurer's report.

Comptom reported the treasury was in good shape and that the club had $20,000 in the bank.


Old business.

The calendar shows the awards dinner for June 2.

Part of the agenda was taken out of order to accommodate late arrivals.


New business.

The board discussed giving a $100 donation for the Beverly Kees Memorial Fund Scholarship for journalism. The donation was approved.


Contest rule changes.

Circulation requirements. The board decided instead to allow the San Mateo County Times, the Contra Costa Times and The Examiner staffs to enter under the masthead of their individual paper within the larger media organization. Therefore Examiner staff members can enter under the San Mateo Examiner or the Redwood City Examiner rather than just The Examiner which would force them into Category A. The same is true for the San Mateo County Times and any other paper under similar circumstances.

Category changes. Several new categories were added and some were removed to reflect a more realistic representation of entries.

1. Additions.

A. Breaking news.

B. On-going coverage.

C. Sports game story.

D. Analysis.

2. Deletions.

A. Television photography (all three categories). There are not many entries and photographers can enter in regular television categories.

B. Public relations (all four categories). PR people can enter in magazines/trade publications categories.

C. Editorial cartoon.

3. Modifications.

A. Columns were broken into two categories of news column and feature column.

It was also agreed that series work and on-going coverage can include stories outside of the calendar year if the bulk of the reporting was done inside of the calendar year. This would accommodate stories such as Scott Peterson trial coverage.

Sakuma mentioned there will be a Peterson reception at the San Mateo County History Museum and he is asking for help in obtaining front pages of newspapers covering significant dates in the Peterson trial for the display. Carter said she would assist.


The meeting was adjourned at 7:47 p.m.

The next meeting of the Press Club board will be Feb. 9 at 6:15 p.m.

Minutes submitted by Jon Mays.

Wednesday, January 12, 2005

Fang sues to regain control of Examiner

Florence Fang and other members of her family are suing to regain control of the San Francisco Examiner and other publishing assets, alleging they were misled into a $20 million sale last year by the betrayal of a former executive, Scott McKibben. The Fang family, which owned the Examiner for three years, wants a San Mateo County Superior Court judge to nullify the paper's sale to Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz as part of a lawsuit filed against Anschutz and the paper's current publisher, McKibben. Before Anschutz bought the Examiner 11 months ago, McKibben oversaw the paper for the Fangs.

Fangs sue to regain control of Examiner

By The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO - The Examiner's former owners are suing to regain control of the San Francisco newspaper and other publishing assets, alleging they were misled into a $20 million sale last year by the betrayal of a former executive.

The Fang family, which owned the Examiner for three years, wants a San Mateo County Superior Court judge to nullify the paper's sale to Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz as part of a lawsuit filed against Anschutz and the paper's current publisher, P. Scott McKibben. Before Anschutz bought the Examiner 11 months ago, McKibben oversaw the paper for the Fangs.

In their suit, the Fangs allege McKibben rebuffed other potential buyers so Anschutz could buy the paper and other assets at a deeply discounted price. The suit contends McKibben concealed a possible conflict of interest as he negotiated the deal - his brother, Ryan, was an Anschutz consultant at the time of the sale.

After the Fangs agreed to the sale, Anschutz named P. Scott McKibben as the Examiner's publisher and subsequently named Ryan McKibben as chief executive of Clarity Media Group, the San Francisco paper's newly formed parent company, according to the lawsuit.

P. Scott McKibben declined to comment on the lawsuit when contacted Wednesday.

The Fangs filed their complaint in November after McKibben sued them, alleging the family owes him a $1.2 million commission for brokering the Anschutz deal.

In their suit, the Fangs say they never signed a contract authorizing the commission. What's more, the Fangs say they should be rewarded $11 million in damages and the sale should be nullified.

Anschutz, one of the country's wealthiest men with an estimated $5.2 billion fortune, is trying to resuscitate the Examiner as a free tabloid. The paper, once a cornerstone in the publishing empire of William Randolph Hearst, hemorrhaged readers - and money - for years as readers defected to the larger San Francisco Chronicle and suburban rivals.

The persistent headaches prompted the Hearst Corp. to jettison the Examiner shortly after buying the Chronicle for $660 million in 2000. As part of an unusual deal, Hearst turned over the Examiner to the Fangs with a $66.7 million subsidy to help keep the paper alive. The Fangs, longtime owners of numerous San Francisco Bay area weeklies, sold the Examiner after the subsidy ran out.