Tuesday, December 21, 2004

Anschutz registers "Examiner" in 69 cities

By Jason Blevins
Denver Post Staff Writer


Denver investor Philip Anschutz is staking his claim on the name "The Examiner."

The nascent newspaper publisher has filed 127 U.S. applications to trademark general circulation newspapers with "The Examiner" name in 69 cities, including Denver.

Clarity Media Group spent tens of thousands of dollars on the applications, based on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's $335 filing fee.

Anschutz spokesman Jim Monaghan said the applications are meant to protect the name of the San Francisco paper.

"It was a prudent business move to protect The Examiner trademark broadly," Monaghan said. "We don't want to talk about our business strategy. But things are going very well in San Francisco, and it seemed prudent to protect the value of the trademark."

Anschutz, the founder of Qwest Communications International who ranks 33rd among Forbes' richest 400 Americans with a net worth of $5.2 billion, purchased the five-day-a-week San Francisco Examiner and two weekly newspapers in February. In September, he bought three papers near Washington. . Clarity Media Group is headed by former Denver Post executives Ryan McKibben and Frederick Anderson.

As Anschutz's newspaper group established roots on both coasts, Clarity quietly applied to broadly trademark "The Examiner" name. Once the flagship of William Randolph Hearst's 28-newspaper, 18-magazine media empire, the San Francisco Examiner had devolved into a thin free weekday paper.

Other cities where Clarity sought trademarks include Long Island, N.Y.; Des Moines, Iowa; Detroit; Kansas City, Mo.; ; New Orleans; Phoenix; Salt Lake City; and Boston.

Lynn Parker Hendrix of the Denver law firm Holme Roberts & Owen made the filings for Clarity.

Staff writer Jason Blevins can be reached at 303-820-1374 or jblevins@denverpost.com.

(c) 2004, The Denver Post

Anschutz reserves 'Examiner' name in 69 cities

In a possible sign that he seeks to launch a nationwide newspaper chain, billionaire Phil Anschutz has filed 127 U.S. applications to trademark the name "The Examiner" in 69 cities. Anschutz, the founder of Qwest Communications International who ranks 33rd among Forbes' richest 400 Americans with a net worth of $5.2 billion, purchased the five-day-a-week San Francisco Examiner and two weekly newspapers in February. In September, he bought three papers near Washington.

Friday, December 3, 2004

Federal probe into media leaks sought

The U.S. Department of Justice has been asked to conduct an investigation into Chronicle stories detailing grand jury testimony in the baseball steroids case, the Chronicle reports. "Violations of grand jury secrecy rules will not be tolerated,'' said Kevin Ryan, head of the U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco. The request followed a Chronicle story Thursday revealing testimony by New York Yankee Jason Giambi that he had injected himself with human growth hormone during the 2003 baseball season and had begun using steroids at least two years before then.

Sunday, November 21, 2004

Anschutz Has a Low Profile and a Large Footprint

By Annys Shin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, November 21, 2004; Page A01

For a publicity-shy billionaire, Philip F. Anschutz knows how to make his mark.

In 1998, when the Denver businessman couldn't resolve a dispute with a hog farm next door to his ranch, he funded an initiative to change state law, setting the toughest hog-farming restrictions in the country, and pushed his neighbor out of business.

In 2000, after waiting for Hollywood to make more family-friendly and inspirational movies, he started producing films such as "Holes," last year's sleeper hit about a boy sent to a detention camp to dig holes, and "Ray," the Ray Charles biopic.

With a penchant for acting on a grand scale, Anschutz, 64, has a way of instantly becoming a major player in any scene and any city he enters.

Now, the Denver investor is on the cusp of becoming a major presence in Washington with ambitious plans for soccer team D.C. United and his new ownership of the area's Journal Newspapers Inc.

Since taking control of D.C. United three years ago, Anschutz has made it a priority to turn around the team's fortunes and make it more attractive financially. He is on track to do both. D.C. United recently won the 2004 Major League Soccer championship, its fourth title and first since 1999. And Anschutz representatives are in talks with city officials about building a 24,000-seat, soccer-only stadium on the Anacostia River, an effort to increase the value of the team.

Anschutz is also behind the newspapers that are turning up on front lawns across Bethesda and Alexandria. In October, Anschutz bought the financially troubled Journal chain of suburban tabloids based in Alexandria. A few months earlier, Anschutz paid $20 million for the San Francisco Examiner, the former flagship of the Hearst publishing empire, the Independent and their printing company. The Examiner purchase sparked concerns among critics in San Francisco that he wanted to use the newspaper to promote his conservative beliefs, a charge his executives deny. With both operations, Anschutz appears to be creating a new model of newspapers, a hybrid between free community papers and big-city tabloids.

Though the amount paid for Journal Newspapers wasn't disclosed, both acquisitions could safely be called small for Anschutz, who is used to brokering deals worth hundreds of millions of dollars. But those who know him know not to underestimate him. Whether in railroads, telecommunications or sports and entertainment, Anschutz has a track record of finding undervalued assets and turning them into major players.



Diversified Holdings

Anschutz first struck it rich in the oil fields of Wyoming and Utah and then proceeded to sink his wealth into a variety of investments. He owns railroads and is the investor-operator of five of the 10 Major League Soccer franchises. He is the largest stakeholder in Regal Entertainment Group, the nation's largest movie exhibition chain with 18 Washington area theaters and 550 nationwide, and Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Despite his glamorous investments, he is not one for glitz. Once called "the billionaire next door" by Fortune magazine, Anschutz eschews many of the trappings of wealth. He prefers cowboy boots to wingtips and sitting behind the wheel to sitting behind a chauffeur. He avoids bodyguards and is regularly spotted jogging around his Denver neighborhood, where he and his wife, Nancy, have lived for more than 30 years.

Anschutz also shuns the limelight. Most of his companies are privately held. As a rule, he doesn't speak to reporters; he's granted only a few on-the-record interviews over the past 30 years. Through a spokesperson in Denver, he declined to be interviewed for this story.

A low profile hasn't protected him from controversy. He has taken the heat for funding organizations that oppose legalized abortion and legal protections for gays and lesbians. And he was non-executive chairman of Qwest Communications International Inc., the Denver telecommunications company involved in an accounting scandal.

However, none of these scandals has yet to tarnish Anschutz's reputation as an investor. He's still admired for having the foresight to lay thousands of miles of fiber-optic cable alongside railroad rights of way he controlled. He wasn't the first to use railroad tracks to lay communications lines. But he did it on an unprecedented scale and later reaped at least $1 billion from the sale of Qwest stock. Said Jim McClellan, a former executive of Norfolk Southern Railway Co., "[Anschutz] doesn't think like you and me."



The Dealmaker

Anschutz acquired his financial savvy by watching his father, a Kansas wildcatter, ride the booms and busts of the oil business. Shortly after graduating from the University of Kansas in 1961, Anschutz became a wildcatter himself, founding the Anschutz Co. He moved to Denver, where his father once had an office.

After he was in business a couple of years, he later told the Colorado Historical Society in a 1974 interview, he experienced a crisis, which he referred to as "the most important single event" in his business career. A well he owned a stake in struck oil and soon caught fire.

Over the next several days, working on little sleep, Anschutz persuaded the other stakeholder to increase Anschutz's share in the well if Anschutz could contain the blaze. He then sought out Red Adair, a famous firefighter who later put out the oil well fires during the Gulf War. In part to pay Adair, Anschutz persuaded a movie studio to pay him $100,000 to film Adair putting out his well fire for a 1967 John Wayne film called "Hellfighters." The fire was put out and Anschutz saved his business.

Anschutz went on to uncover one of the country's largest natural gas reserves in Wyoming. In 1982, he sold half his interest in the Anschutz Ranch East Field for $500 million, catapulting him to No. 13 on Forbes's list of the richest Americans. He next invested in railroads, and through his control of railroad rights of way, he was able to build Qwest's fiber-optic network.

Qwest went public in 1997, and at its peak, its stock boosted Anschutz's personal fortune to $18 billion, according to Forbes. However, it turned out that Qwest and its competitors overbuilt fiber-optic capacity. The demand they anticipated never materialized. In 2002, Qwest announced it would restate $1 billion in earnings.

Qwest last month agreed to pay $250 million to settle Securities and Exchange Commission charges of fraudulently booking $3.8 billion in revenue over three years. Two former Qwest executives pleaded guilty to fraud; two were acquitted. Authorities have not implicated Anschutz in any wrongdoing.

In 2002, New York Attorney General Eliot L. Spitzer sued Anschutz and four telecom executives, accusing Anschutz of making $1.5 billion in "unjust enrichment revenue," including the sale of initial-public-offering stock Anschutz received in the hopes he would steer investment banking business to Citigroup Inc. Anschutz and Spitzer reached an agreement in which Anschutz admitted no wrongdoing and later paid $4.4 million to law schools and charities, and Spitzer agreed to drop the suit.

That same year, Anschutz stepped down as Qwest's non-executive chairman. Anschutz remains on Qwest's board and still has 80 percent of his original Qwest holdings, which have lost significant value.



A Matter of Values

He has since focused his attention on building a global entertainment and sports business. He is a part owner of the $407 million Staples Center, home to the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Kings.

Anschutz is also the largest shareholder in Regal Entertainment, which he created in 2000 by combining three movie theater chains that had filed for bankruptcy protection: United Artists Theatre Co., Regal Cinemas, and Edwards Theatres. In the past 12 months, Regal, now a public company, paid out two large dividends. Anschutz netted $710 million. He had invested $500 million to create Regal.

Anschutz took on movie making, too. In 2000, he formed a film production company, Crusader Entertainment -- recently renamed Bristol Bay Productions. "He believes there is a huge untapped market for things families can do together. That doesn't mean it's a family values agenda," said James Monaghan, an Anschutz spokesman. "He found in raising his [three] kids there is not a lot of things he could go to with them."

As a producer, Anschutz has a clear idea of what he wants his films to say, said Angelo Pizzo, a screenwriter Crusader hired to write what Pizzo called "a family-friendly inspirational soccer movie." Pizzo, who penned hits such as "Hoosiers," and "Rudy," said Anschutz called him several times, including late at night, with suggestions. "His concern is not the craft. It's the points made, in terms of the message," Pizzo said. "He cares about sending a positive inspirational message to young people."

In a rare public speech in February, reported by the Wall Street Journal, Anschutz told the audience: "My friends think I'm a candidate for a lobotomy, and my competitors think I'm naive or stupid or both. But you know what? I don't care. If we can make some movies that have a positive effect on people's lives and on our culture, that's enough for me."

His purchases this year of the San Francisco Examiner and the Journal Newspapers, weak publications in competitive markets, led some in San Francisco to wonder if he wants to send a particular message through his newspapers. "People have the yips about a conservative owner owning a paper in a liberal town," said Christopher Caen, a columnist for the Examiner.

"When he bought the Examiner, we thought, 'What the hell is this guy doing?' Its business prospects were not phenomenal," said Tim Redmond, executive editor of the liberal San Francisco Bay Guardian. "When we found out who he was, we were nervous he was going to bring his Christian-evangelical politics to San Francisco."

Anschutz has supported socially conservative causes. In 1987, Anschutz's family foundation gave Focus on the Family founder James Dobson an award for his "contributions to the American Family." According to its Web site, the Denver-based group works to "counter the media-saturating message that homosexuality is inborn and unchangeable" and one of its policy experts called legalized abortion an example of when "Satan temporarily succeeds in destroying God's creation."

In 1992, Anschutz contributed $10,000 to a group called Colorado Family Values, to support an amendment to the state constitution that invalidated state and local laws against discrimination based on sexual orientation. Anschutz's money helped pay for an ad campaign that said such anti-bias laws gave gays and lesbians "special rights." The U.S. Supreme Court later overturned the amendment as discriminatory.

Anschutz is an active Republican donor. Since 1996, he, his companies and members of his family have given more than $500,000 in campaign contributions to GOP candidates and committees.

Robert Starzel, president of SF Newspaper Co., Anschutz's Bay Area newspaper group, said Anschutz does not meddle in editorial policy. "[Anschutz] has kept in close touch. But he's taken no hand in the operations, nor in demanding any particular editorial policy," Starzel said.

At Journal Newspapers, Anschutz's vision is to meet the growing demand for "individualized content by giving people localized news," said publisher Jim McDonald. McDonald is a former executive with Metro International, a Luxembourg-based publisher of free commuter tabloids across Europe and in Philadelphia and Boston.

The revamped Journal Newspapers are fatter on copy and ads than under the previous owners, the Phillips family of Arkansas, who closed bureaus and laid off reporters. Some actions point to a forthcoming District edition. Journal Newspapers recently took out ads on journalism job sites looking for a full-time design director, page designer and copy editor to work in Washington. Asked if he plans to launch a D.C. edition, McDonald in an e-mail replied: "No comment."

The Journal Newspapers compete with Washington Post Co. publications and the Washington Times.



A Man in Control

Anschutz associates are more forthcoming about plans for D.C. United and the stadium here.

Anschutz Entertainment Group has invested a total of about $300 million in soccer in the United States. Of its soccer franchises, only the L.A. Galaxy team is turning a profit, according to company spokesman Michael Roth. Last year, Anschutz sold the Colorado Rapids. He is in talks to sell the San Jose Earthquakes and has put D.C. United on the market.

D.C. United President Kevin Payne said he recently returned to United's front office after a stint managing all of AEG's soccer franchises for the purpose of getting the team in shape for a sale and closing the stadium deal. Stadium deals are a way to make teams more attractive to buyers, Payne said.

While the details are yet to be worked out, Payne said he expects it will be similar to AEG's other stadium deals. AEG -- or the new owners -- will put up some money to build the stadium. The city will likely lease the land to the team. The team owners will retain operating rights, entitling them to revenue from ticket sales, concessions and naming rights.

Payne is handling negotiations but expects Anschutz to keep abreast of developments. Anschutz, he said, is always coming up with creative ways to wring out synergies. Just last month, Payne received an e-mail from the boss telling him to take some guest to the grand opening of Regal Cinemas at Gallery Place to see a preview of "Ray."

Payne said he often receives such notes. When you work for Phil Anschutz, Payne said, "you get used to it."



(c) 2004 The Washington Post Company

Anschutz takes show to Washington

Billionaire Phil Anschutz, who bought the Examiner in February, has rolled out a similar free tabloid in Washington, D.C. The rival Washington Post, in this story looks at Anschutz's past business dealings and his support of conservative issues. The Post reported the following:

    • In 1987, Anschutz's family foundation gave Focus on the Family founder James Dobson an award for his "contributions to the American Family." According to its Web site, the Denver-based group works to "counter the media-saturating message that homosexuality is inborn and unchangeable" and one of its policy experts called legalized abortion an example of when "Satan temporarily succeeds in destroying God's creation."

    • In 1992, Anschutz contributed $10,000 to a group called Colorado Family Values, to support an amendment to the state constitution that invalidated state and local laws against discrimination based on sexual orientation. Anschutz's money helped pay for an ad campaign that said such anti-bias laws gave gays and lesbians "special rights." The U.S. Supreme Court later overturned the amendment as discriminatory.

Wednesday, November 10, 2004

November 2004 Press Club board minutes

Minutes for Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors meeting on Nov. 10, 2004 at the San Mateo Daily News.

Meeting commenced at 6:20 p.m.

Directors present: Micki Carter, Jack Russell, Justin Nyberg, Ed Remitz, John Kane, Jon Mays and Dave Price. Also present: Darryl Compton, executive director. Absent: Aimee Lewis and Bill Workman.

Directors voted to approve the previous meeting's minutes.

Old Business.

Compton reported a treasury in good shape. The treasurer's report was accepted.

There was a discussion of the scholarship coordinator to replace John Kane. The discussion came after new business since Kane was late. Carol Blitzer from the Palo Alto Weekly expressed interest in serving on the committee and possibly taking over Kane's slot.

There were no changes to the by-laws.



New business.

There was a discussion about the upcoming town hall meeting for press/public officials Nov. 29. It was decided that the meeting will be off the record and closed to public. Topics for discussion are incomplete.

At this point, there is only one date on the calendar for the coming year. It is June 2, a Thursday, for the annual press club awards.

There was a preliminary discussion about changes to the awards competition categories. It was agreed there will be more discussion via e-mail before the December board meeting to be held at the Christmas Party, Harry's Hofbrau, Redwood City. The party is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., the PPC Board meeting will take place at 8 p.m.

Meeting was adjourned at 7:25 p.m.

Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Wednesday, October 13, 2004

Merc's cost cutting means no free turkeys

According to San Jose's alt-weekly, Metro, employees at the San Jose Mercury News will no longer get free turkeys as part of a cost-saving move. "Things have hit such a low point at the Mercury News, which is owned by the $5 billion Knight Ridder corporation, whose stock was riding a five-year high last spring, that employees have again begun calling the paper by its in-house nickname, the 'Murky News,'" says Metro.

Friday, October 1, 2004

Examiner owner buys three free dailies

According to Editor & Publisher magazine, San Francisco Examiner publisher and Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz added another group of newspapers to his holdings. On Sept. 30, he purchased Journal Newspapers in Alexandria, Va., which includes the free dailies Northern Virginia Journal, Montgomery Journal, and Prince George's Journal, through a newly formed investment arm, Clarity Media of Denver. Two Denver Post alums head Clarity Media: former President and Publisher Ryan McKibben and former CFO Frederick Anderson. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but analyst John Morton told the Denver Post he estimated the transaction was between $50 million to $75 million. In February, Anschutz bought The Examiner in San Francisco for a widely reported but unconfirmed $20 million. [UPDATE: A JULY 23, 2006 Los Angeles Times article, quoting from San Mateo County Superior Court documents, said the actual price Anschutz paid for the Examiner was $10.7 million]

Saturday, September 25, 2004

Pay of public workers is public, judge says

The public has an overriding interest in knowing the salaries of public employees, a judge ruled Friday (Sept. 24) in a lawsuit filed by the Contra Costa Times against the city of Oakland, which refused to release the salaries of workers who make more than $100,000. The ruling appears to contradict a similar case, Priceless v. Teamsters, on the Peninsula in which the Palo Alto Daily News (owned by Priceless LLC) was unable to obtain the salaries of public workers in five San Mateo County cities. In that case, a San Mateo County Superior Court Judge, Rosemary Pfeiffer, ruled that the privacy interests of the unionized workers outweighed the public's right to know. In Friday's ruling, Alameda County Superior Court Judge Steven Brick went the opposite direction, saying salary data "is needed to scrutinize public budgets to (make sure) taxpayers' limited resources are well spent." Undoubtably the ruling will be appealed.

Pay is public, judge says

By Thomas Peele
CONTRA COSTA TIMES

OAKLAND - The public possesses an overriding interest in knowing the salaries of public employees, a judge said Friday afternoon, indicating he would order Oakland to release employee pay data to the Times that the city has refused to disclose.

"My feeling is the (newspaper's) petition should be granted," Alameda Superior Court Judge Steven A. Brick said at the start of a 70-minute hearing. Salaries, he said, "are a matter of public interest." The Times "has established the manner in which the data has been used in California and elsewhere" in matters of "strong public interest."

Salary data, the judge said, "is needed to scrutinize public budgets to (make sure) taxpayers' limited resources are well spent."

Attorneys for Oakland and two employee unions argued that the exact pay of employees is a matter of confidentiality and personal privacy that the state constitution protects. That journalists might find wrongdoing through far-ranging requests for salaries is too speculative to trump privacy, they argued.

"They could accomplish what they want to accomplish with just the numbers," said Duane Reno, an attorney for the International Federation of Professional Engineers Local 21, which represents the city's white-collar employees.

Times attorney Karl Olson told Brick that reporters need the data to unearth corruption and favoritism. "They want us to uncover government wrongdoing without giving us the information to do so," he said.

The Times sued Oakland in July after the city refused to release data for employees it paid in excess of $100,000 in 2003, an apparent violation of the state Public Records Act and of Oakland's ordinance requiring disclosure of such information. The city had released names with salaries for at least the past eight years.

"Times change," said Julia Bond, an attorney representing the city. She argued that a state appellate court decision last year upheld employees' privacy rights over salary data.

Brick said his only concern was over the salaries of police officers. State law blocking access to police personnel files extends to any other government file where data might be maintained, said Oakland Police Officers Association attorney Alison Berry Wilkinson.

"These are all parts of the file of the employee's record," Wilkinson said of officers' payroll records that other city departments maintain. "Any file maintained under a (police officer's) name is confidential," she said.

Olson said it is clear the law does not extend to financial data the city may use for payroll processing and budget planning. "You can't shield someone simply by putting something in a personnel file," he said. Brick called the issue "highly technical" and said he would study case law on it.

Earlier this month, a state appellate court in Southern California ruled that the San Diego County Civil Service Commission had to release information on a fired deputy sheriff because the commission was not his employer and the information was kept outside the deputy's personnel file. The deputy's lawyers argued the information, including the officer's name, was confidential.

The Times' case against Oakland has drawn statewide interest. The Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union Tribune, Sacramento Bee, San Francisco Chronicle and the California Newspaper Publishers Association filed friend-of-the-court briefs supporting the Times.

State Sen. Tom Torlakson, D-Antioch, said last month he would introduce a bill in December to ensure that no government employee salary information is withheld from public disclosure.

On Friday, attorney Duane Reno told Brick that if newspapers obtained city pay records they might sell them to banks or advertisers. That would invite unwanted solicitations from investment counselors or stockbrokers, he said.

Olson noted that Oakland has released salary data in past years and that neither the city nor the unions could cite any instances in which employees were approached in such a matter or in any way harassed.

"The people who are going to take advantage of it in a manipulative sense are already doing it," Brick said.

While Reno and Wilkinson argued that the Times' request for information was too broad, Olson countered that the newspaper asked only for names and salaries of about 10 percent of the roughly 5,400-member city work force.

"We are talking about discriminate disclosure," Olson said of employees paid in excess of $100,000. Brick said he would issue a written decision within 90 days.



(c) 2004 ContraCostaTimes.com and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, September 10, 2004

ANG Newspapers accused of 'Best of' contest fraud; Ex-advertising director claims he uncovered 'hoax'

Sept. 10, 2004


By the Pleasanton Weekly

A former advertising director has filed a lawsuit against ANG Newspapers, publisher of the Tri-Valley Herald and other newspapers, and two of its former executives claiming that their "Best of" awards competition "was for years a massive hoax."

In his complaint, filed in Alameda County Superior Court, David Marin states that he was fired in March 2003, allegedly for reasons not related to the "Best of" contest, but less than a year after he was promoted to Director of Advertising at ANG and uncovered the deception.

The lawsuit, filed by Attorney David Hosilyk of the Half Moon Bay law firm of Fine, Boggs, Cope and Perkins, names as defendants ANG Newspapers, Michael Lynch and Colleen Brewer. Lynch was Executive Vice President of Advertising and Marketing for ANG Newspapers, and Brewer was the company's advertising executive responsible for handling the "Best of" contest. Neither Lynch nor Brewer is now employed by ANG.

Marin states that before he took over as Advertising Director, "the readers, the public and advertisers were being defrauded."

"The true winner of the poll would not necessarily be awarded the 'Best of' designation, but rather the business that spent the most, or was likely to spend the most on advertising was given the award instead," the lawsuit states. "This resulted in false advertising and a fraud being perpetrated on advertisers, readers and the general public for the personal financial gain of Brewer and the financial gain of the other defendants."

Marin states in the complaint that ANG Newspapers "defrauded the general public, readers (consumers and subscribers) and advertisers by rigging the results of the 'Best of' poll" and that its action "constitutes unfair and/or fraudulent business practices."

The lawsuit also claims that when Marin became Advertising Director, "he ended this fraud upon the public, insisting that his department would run an honest 'Best of' contest." However, Marin believed that his repudiation of Brewer's past practices caused her to feel animosity toward him and was a motivating factor in his termination the following year.

Marin also claimed that Lynch, as well as ANG and its managing agents, was aware of the fraud and "condoned it and ratified it."

The lawsuit seeks an injunction ordering ANG Newspapers "to cease engaging in unfair and/or deceptive business practices and should be ordered to publish retractions and announcements of its fraud and to publish the true winners of the 'Best of' contests."

John Schueler, ANG's president and publisher, said there is no basis for Marin's suit and his comments are without merit.

"We've been doing 'Best of' for quite a number of years," Schueler said. "It's a fair and unique program and his (Marin's) allegations that winners are picked solely because they're advertisers does not appear to be true at all. The documentation I've seen show that many of the votes that came in were counted by a third party and that there were winners who were not advertisers."

(c) 2004, Embarcadero Publishing Co.

Suit: ANG's 'Best of' contest is rigged

A former advertising director has filed a lawsuit against ANG Newspapers, publisher of the Tri-Valley Herald and other newspapers, and two of its former executives claiming that their "Best of" awards competition "was for years a massive hoax," the Pleasanton Weekly reports. In his complaint, filed in Alameda County Superior Court, David Marin states that he was fired in March 2003, allegedly for reasons not related to the "Best of" contest, but less than a year after he was promoted to Director of Advertising at ANG and uncovered the deception.

Wednesday, September 8, 2004

September 2004 Press Club board minutes

At the San Mateo Daily News

Meeting commenced at 6:20 p.m.

Directors present: Micki Carter, John Kane, Jack Russell, and Ed Remitz. Also present: Darryl Compton, executive director. Directors absent: Aimee Lewis, Jon Mays, Justin Nyberg, Dave Price and Bill Workman.

Directors voted 4-0 to approve previous meeting's minutes.

Treasurer's Report:
Compton reported the treasury is solvent.

Old Business:

Compton reported that the PPC website has been enhanced with additional journalism links.

Compton reported that a series of technical changes to PPC bylaws have been prepared for review and approval by the membership during a board meeting in November. The changes include moving the annual meeting from September to January and directing the executive director to process membership applications.

New Business:

Directors decided a board meeting and Christmas party will be held Dec. 8. Details for the party are to be arranged.

Carter noted that congratulations are in order for two directors -- Aimee Lewis is expecting a baby in January and Jon Mays is planning to marry. The directors joined in congratulating both.

The meeting adjourned at 7 p.m.

Minutes submitted by director Ed Remitz.

Saturday, September 4, 2004

Should reporters make political donations?

"SPJ Salon: Giving to the Pols," with San Francisco Chronicle readers' representative Dick Rogers, KCBS-AM director of news and programming Ed Cavagnaro, and San Francisco Bay Guardian executive editor Tim Redmond. Moderated by Grade the News project director John McManus.

Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2004
6-8 p.m.; program starts promptly at 6:45 p.m.
London Wine Bar
415 Sansome Str. (between Sacramento and Clay), San Francisco

Admission is free and the bar is non-hosted. We'll have the lower level of the London Wine Bar to ourselves. Before the discussion begins, there will be time for socializing.

Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Newspapers argue for disclosure of data

Major newspapers in California have rallied behind the Contra Costa Times' public records lawsuit against Oakland, arguing in a friend of the court brief that knowing exact salary for government employees is an essential part of democracy, the Times reports. What the government pays its employees "cries out for public scrutiny," the brief states. Those signing the brief include the California Newspaper Publishers Association; the San Jose Mercury News; the Los Angeles Times; the McClatchy Co., publisher of the Sacramento Bee; the Copley Press, publisher of the San Diego Union-Tribune; and the Hearst Corp., publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle. The Contra Costa Times sued Oakland in July after the city turned down the newspaper's public records petition for the names and salaries of all employees to whom the city paid more than $100,000 in 2003.

Thursday, August 19, 2004

August 2004 Press Club board minutes

Minutes for Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors meeting on Aug. 18, 2004 at the San Mateo Daily News.

Meeting commenced at 6:26 p.m.

Directors present: Micki Carter, Jack Russell, Ed Remitz, John Kane, Jon Mays and Dave Price. Also present: Darryl Compton, executive director.

Absent: Aimee Lewis, Justin Nyberg and Bill Workman.

Directors voted 5-0 to approve the previous meeting's minutes.

Old Business.

Compton reported a treasury in good shape. All scholarships were paid out and all expenses are current.

Carter announced someone is still needed to run the bench/bar media.

The board was re-elected and one voter emphasized that Carter was doing a good job.

There was a celebration of Russell's birthday.

New business.

Price moved to donate $500 each to CalAware and the California First Amendment Coalition and $100 to the Student Press Law Center. It was seconded by Kane and approved. The donation was made because of the important work the organizations do to defend the rights of a free press.

Meeting was adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

Minutes submitted by secretary Jon Mays.

Tuesday, August 10, 2004

Examiner goes to Canada to find new editor

Vivienne Sosnowski has been tapped as San Francisco Examiner's new executive editor. Before joining the Vancouver Province in 2000, she was executive editor of the Toronto-based National Post and managing editor of the Vancouver Sun.

Wednesday, August 4, 2004

Palo Alto won't name names on salary list

Palo Alto won't name names on salary list

By Dan Stober
Mercury News

The city of Palo Alto released lists Wednesday showing how much each of its employees earned in the last three years, but, unlike a similar list it handed out last year, this one omitted most workers' names.

It's not because the city was unwilling. No one asked for them.

Palo Alto Daily News publisher Dave Price, who made the request, initially did request the names, along with job titles and pay, but he scaled back the request after the city's firefighter union threatened to sue him for invasion of privacy.

"What kind of a country do we live in, where if you ask a question, you get sued? That's really off,'' Price said Wednesday.

The debate in Palo Alto is part of a larger battle about privacy vs. access to public records and the right of citizens to know how their tax dollars are spent.

The public needs the salaries of individual city workers in order to judge the competency and honesty of city government, according to Price and other open records advocates. ``A lot of times you can spot mismanagement in government by how overtime is being paid out,'' he said.

The numbers released Wednesday, which were also made available to the Mercury News, did shed light on some interesting facts about how Palo Alto's employees are paid:

A Palo Alto police agent earned $84,644 in overtime last year, making him the king of overtime and one of the highest paid officials in the city. The unnamed officer collected $85,811 in regular pay, giving him a grand total of $170,455. He was essentially working two jobs, investigating crimes and filling a vacant dispatcher's position, according to Assistant City Manager Emily Harrison.

Overall, firefighters tended to earn the most overtime. That's because the department is required to maintain a certain staffing level at all times, said Tony Spitaleri, a union leader. It's cheaper for the city to pay overtime than to hire more workers and fund their benefits, he said.

Total spending on salaries has gone up in the past three years, despite the recession. That's because city workers signed generous multi-year union contracts before the economic bust, Harrison said.

The highest paid worker in 2003 was City Manager Frank Benest, who earned $179,712.

It has long been assumed that the public could learn the salary of a specific public employee, but a state appeals court ruling in October threw that assumption into question.

Employee unions sued several Peninsula cities, and ultimately the Daily News and the Mercury News, to block release of names-and-salaries lists. California's 1st District Court of Appeal in San Francisco ruled that privacy rights could trump the state public records law.

A settlement in the case left the newspapers without the lists they sought.

"I suspect it's been quite influential in encouraging public employee unions to get involved in resisting these disclosures,'' said Terry Francke, a public records expert at Californians Aware, an organization based in Carmichael that supports open government.

The city of Oakland has cited that appeals court ruling in refusing to release detailed salary lists to the Contra Costa Times. Price said he would let the Times, backed by the resources of its parent company, Knight-Ridder Newspapers, wage the legal fight over names. His own paper is too small to pay the necessary legal bills, he said.

Contact Dan Stober at dstober@mercurynews.com or (650) 688-7536.

Friday, July 23, 2004

CCTimes sues Oakland for salary disclosure

The Contra Costa Times reports that it filed suit against the city of Oakland yesterday (July 22), demanding that it release the salaries of its employees along with their names. The suit in Alameda County Superior Court comes after the city on July 5 rejected a public records request the newspaper made in June for the names of all employees to whom the city paid more than $100,000 in 2003. Oakland refused to release the salaries with names, claiming that doing so would violate workers' privacy. The city has released such information in the past. The Times sued as a growing number of California governments, from Oakland to BART to small cities, are refusing to release employee salary data.

Thursday, July 22, 2004

Chron puts editor on leave for campaign contribution

The letters editor at the Chronicle, who decides which letters the paper publishes, gave $400 to John Kerry's presidential campaign, an apparent violation of the paper's ethics policy. The editor, William Pates, was put on leave last week. Today, the Chron's editorial page editor, John Diaz, who is a regular guest on PBS's "The News Hour," explained what happened to that program. Here's a link

Saturday, July 10, 2004

Wevurski named ANG managing editor

Pete Wevurski, a former ANG staffer who has been working as a sports editor at the Newark (N.J.) Star-Ledger, is returning to ANG as managing editor, Executive Editor Kevin Keane announced. "Pete Wevurski is an extraordinary newspaper editor who will make immediate and lasting contributions to the ANG team," said Keane, "It's great to have him back." In his new role as managing editor for ANG, Wevurski will oversee the day-to-day news operations and work with editors and reporters on local story development and follow-through.

Wednesday, July 7, 2004

How to join the Press Club

Please e-mail us at sfpen-pressclub@sbcglobal.net and include your name, title, employer, address and phone number. Also let us know what committees you'd like to join: Awards, Awards Banquet, Scholarship, Nominating, Newsletter, High School Journalism Awards, Bench Bar Media or Other.

Membership at $35 a year is open to present/former working journalists who live in or work in the nine Bay Area counties.

This includes publishers, editorial staff members, staff photographers of newspapers, magazines, and other publications of general circulation who are regularly employed on a full-time basis; General Managers, editorial staff members, and staff photographers for radio stations, television stations, and wire services who are regularly employed on a full-time basis; professors, instructors, or lecturers employed in accredited college or university schools or departments of Journalism, Mass Communication, or Public Relations; professional freelance photographers or writers who perform a major portion of their work for newspapers, magazines, syndications, publications of general circulation, radio or television stations, or wire services; and persons regularly engaged on a full-time basis in public relations and/or public affairs whose principal duties require contact with the news media.

Associate memberships are available for $35 per year to persons who, in their business or professional capacities, serve as an important and continuing news source and/or who are designated by the Board of Directors to have a community interest with the Club's active members.

Student Memberships are also available at a discounted rate of $15 to students with declared majors in journalism or communications, enrolled in at least nine units at an accredited college or university in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Retired journalists or public relations persons may join at a discounted rate of $20 per year.

Professional journalism or public relations couples who wish to both be members of the association with separate listings may join for $50 per year.

Members receive invitations to PPC sponsored events free or at a discounted rate compared to non-members. Members also receive discounts on their entries to the PPC Awards.

Minutes of Press Club board meetings

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2005

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    2004

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    2003

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    2002

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  • San Francisco Peninsula Press Club By-Laws

    The name of the organization shall be the Peninsula Press Club* (a non-profit organization).

    ARTICLE I
    Purpose


    The Peninsula Press Club (PPC) was founded in 1974 to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions among professionals in various news and public relations organizations. Other goals include promoting professional competence and knowledge, encouraging students to enter journalism by awarding scholarships and providing an organization in which to share fellowship. The PPC provides educational programs to increase public knowledge of the media and to encourage and reward high standards of professionalism.

    ARTICLE II
    Principal Offices and Fiscal Year


    Principal offices shall be in San Mateo County, California with a fiscal year from July 1 to June 30.

    ARTICLE III
    Membership


    Section 1. Eligibility. Membership in the Peninsula Press Club shall be open to persons who either live or work in the San Francisco Bay Area and who qualify for one of the following classifications:

    Active Members

    1. Publishers, editors, editorial staff photographers of newspapers, magazines, electronic news media and other publications of general circulation;

    2. General managers, editorial staff members and staff photographers of television or radio stations, electronic media or wire services;

    3. Professors, instructors or lecturers employed in accredited schools, colleges, universities, departments of Journalism, Mass Communications or Public Relations;

    4. Professional free-lance photographers or writers who perform a major portion of their work for newspapers, magazines, syndicates, publications of general circulation, radio stations, television stations, electronic media or wire services.

    5. Persons regularly engaged in public relations, and/or public affairs whose principal duties require contact with the news media or the public at large.

    Associate Members

    1. Persons who, in their business or professional capacity, serve as an important and continuing news source and/or are adjudged by the Board of Directors to have a community of interest with the Club's Active members.

    Couple Members

    1. Professional journalists or public relations couples who both wish membership with separate listings in the membership roster.

    Retired Members

    1. Professional journalists or public relations persons who are retired but wish to remain active in the association.

    Student Members

    1. Students with a declared major in journalism, mass communications or public relations enrolled in at least nine (9) units in an accredited school, college or university in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

    Section 2. Application for Membership: The PPC Membership Committee shall accept and review all membership applications and present them with recommendation, to the PPC Board of Directors. Acceptance shall be by a two-thirds vote of the Board members at any legally constituted meeting of the Board. Memberships are not transferable.

    Section 3: Membership Privileges: Active members shall have full voting privileges and may hold office. Associate and student members shall not be eligible to vote and may not hold office.

    Section 4: Dues: The amount of dues in each category shall be determined by the Board of Directors and listed on the application forms. Past Presidents are not charged dues. Manner and time of payment shall be determined by the Board of Directors. Only active members in good standing shall have voting privileges. Dues in arrears over thirty (30) days shall result in the member being dropped from the membership rolls and a fee of $10 shall be imposed (in addition to the regular dues) for reapplication. A majority vote of the Board of Directors shall be required to change or add new categories of membership.


    ARTICLE IV
    Board of Directors
    Election, Management and Control


    Section 1. The general affairs, funds and properties of the Club shall be managed and controlled (under non-profit laws determined by the State of California and the government of the United States of America) by a nine-member Board of Directors comprising the President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and five (5) other directors-at-large. All members of the Board of Directors shall be elected by the general active membership. All candidates for such offices must be in good standing. Terms of officers and directors shall begin July 1 of each year.

    Section 2. The President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer shall be elected from and by the active members in good standing in accordance with the provisions of Article VIII and shall hold office for one year or until their successor(s) are elected. There shall be no automatic succession to any office. The President may serve no more than two consecutive terms in office. No restrictions shall be placed on the number of successive terms of office for other officers.

    Section 3. Directors shall be elected for two-year terms of office with no restrictions on the number of successive terms. All candidates run at-large. Directorships shall be filled according to the largest number of votes received. The votes shall be decided by a flip of a coin by the President in the presence of the candidates involved in the case of a tie vote.

    Section 4. The Board of Directors may fill any vacancies in the offices of President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer unless said vacancy occurs within two (2) months preceding a regularly scheduled election. In such case, the office shall remain vacant pending the new election of officers. A vacancy in the office of director from any cause other than expiration of term shall be filled by the Board for the balance of the term providing such vacancy occurs more than two months preceding a regularly scheduled election. Any Board member absent for three consecutive meetings without valid excuse may be removed from the Board and replaced. Valid excuse shall be determined by a majority vote at a regular meeting of the Board.

    Section 5. The Board of Directors shall meet at least quarterly as directed by the Board or at special meetings at the call of the President, or by written request of any two (2) members of the Board. Six (6) members present at a meeting shall constitute a quorum of the Board.

    ARTICLE V
    President and Vice President


    Section 1. The President shall preside at all meetings of the Club and shall act as chair of the Board of Directors. The President shall have general supervision of the business of the Club and shall see that all orders and resolutions of the Board are carried into effect. The President shall be an ex-officio member of all committees.

    Section 2. The Vice President shall assume the duties and functions of the President in his/her absence. In the event of a vacancy in the office of the president by reason of resignation, death or otherwise, the Vice President shall fill the office and assume the duties and functions of the President until the Board fills the vacancy.

    ARTICLE VI
    Secretary


    The Secretary shall give notice of all meetings of the Board of Directors and shall keep minutes of such meetings. The Secretary shall furnish the Treasurer with the names of those elected to membership and have available for use at each membership meeting a duly certified list of members eligible to vote.

    ARTICLE VII
    Treasurer


    The Treasurer shall collect all dues and shall keep the accounts of the Club, reporting thereon at each meeting of the Board of Directors. The Treasurer shall have custody of the Club's accounts and shall pay all bills duly certified by the President or the Board.

    ARTICLE VIII
    Meetings and Elections


    Section 1. Meetings: An annual membership meeting shall be held in September of each calendar year on a day, hour and place to be determined by the Board of Directors. Any issues before the general membership shall be presented at such meeting and may be voted upon by active members in good standing. No member in good standing shall vote or act by proxy. A majority of votes by members present shall determine the issue. The general membership shall be notified by mail not less than 15 or more than 45 days in advance, in writing of the day, time and place of the general meeting of the membership. Any member in good standing may attend any meeting of the Board.

    Section 2. Elections: Three months prior to a general election, the President, with the approval of the Board of Directors, shall appoint a Nominating Committee comprising five (5) active members in good standing including at least one Board member and one Board member at-large to propose candidates for officers and any vacancies on the Board. The committee's report shall be made to the Board at least two months prior to a general election.

    Section 3. The Secretary shall be responsible for the preparation of ballots to be mailed with a self-addressed envelop to all members eligible to vote, not less than 15 or more than 45 days prior to the election. Space for write-in candidates shall be provided on the ballots. The date of the deadline for return of ballots shall be included on the ballots. Ballots postmarked by midnight on the date of the deadline shall be valid.

    Section 4. Members of the Nominating Committee shall serve as Tellers of the Election. They shall receive and tabulate the vote and make their report on the election to the Board of Directors at the next meeting of the Board. The general membership shall be informed of the election outcome in writing within 60 days following the election. Publication in the PPC newsletter may serve as notification in writing.

    Section 5. The term of each office shall begin at the first meeting of the Board following the election with an installation of newly elected Officers and Board members. Newly elected Officers and Board members shall remain in office under the terms of Article IV.

    Section 6. Action shall be taken on any issues and/or questions before the general membership by a majority of votes cast by members in good standing at any meeting of the general membership.

    Section 7. Robert's Rules of Order shall be followed at all meetings of the Club.

    ARTICLE IX
    Committees


    The President with the approval of the Board of Directors shall have the power to appoint a Membership Committee and any other committees, including standing committees, necessary to carry out the Club's business. The Membership and Nominating Committees shall comprise one (1) Board member, and one (1) Officer and three (3) appointed Active members in good standing.

    ARTICLE X
    Non-discrimination


    Section 1. Nothing in these By-laws shall be construed to limit membership, eligibility to hold office, or participate in any of the Club's activities on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin or sex.

    ARTICLE XI
    Amendments


    Amendments. No part of these By-Laws shall be replaced or amended without written submission to the Board of Directors and ratification by a majority of members in good standing attending a general membership meeting.

    Section 1. Each member in good standing shall be furnished a copy in writing of all proposed By-Law amendments no less than 15 or more than 45 days prior to the general membership meeting at which such amendments or revisions are to be voted upon.

    Revised September 2000/mj
    *Name changed from "Peninsula Press Club" to "San Francisco Pensinsula Press Club" by board vote on July 18, 2007

    San Francisco Peninsula Press Club history

    The San Francisco Peninsula Press Club was founded in 1963 to provide a forum for the interchange of idea and opinions between professionals in the various news and public relations media, to provide an organization in which to share fellowship, to promote professional competence and knowledge, to encourage students entering journalism by offering scholarships, and to increase public knowledge of the media though workshops and other exchanges of information.

    Activities include a professional awards competition and banquet, social gatherings and workshops, fund-raising activities incorporating programs of interest to the membership, the annual picnic, and other events as scheduled by the Board of Directors.

    Officers include President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, elected Directors, and the Immediate Past President. An attorney, as well as a financial advisor, assist the board and working committee chairs.

    The club is a California nonprofit corporation that operates according to an approved set of by-laws and collects annual dues from its members to maintain the organization.

    Active membership is open to all working and retired members of the press, radio and television news media, Internet media, and to public relations professionals.

    Associate membership is open to those individuals with a community of interest with other members, who are judged by the directors to be continuing news sources.

    Student membership is open to those who have declared majors in journalism or communications and are enrolled in at least nine units of study at an accredited college or university on the San Francisco Peninsula or in the South Bay. No more than 10 percent of the total membership shall be students.

    Honorary membership is awarded by the directors as special recognition and must be renewed by majority vote of the board every year. Associate, student, and honorary members do not have voting privileges.

    An important activity of the club is the Awards Banquet, which includes presentation of scholarships to high school and college journalism students, and professional journalism awards to winners of mailed-in entries judged by press clubs outside the Bay Area.

    Active membership in the club is considered on the basis of professionalism. A person must earn or have earned a major source of his or her income, or spend or have spent a major portion of his of her working time, in one of the journalistic professions.

    In 2007, the club changed its name from the Peninsula Press Club to the San Francisco Peninsula Press Club. The change came after the decision by the San Francisco Press club to disband. The change came at a time when a growing number of journalists from beyond the Peninsula were joining the club. As of 2007, the club defined its service area to include the counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francsico, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and Sonoma. (Originally posted July 7, 2004; updated July 18, 2007)

    Friday, July 2, 2004

    Chinese newspaper war ignites in SF

    New America Media Online reports that a newspaper war has erupted in San Francisco. The battle was ignited by the entry of Ming Pao Daily News, a paper created by kung fu author Louis Cha, which is challenging the World Journal and Sing Tao Daily. Ming Pao hopes to lure recent immigrants from China with daily half-page sections dedicated to each of the major Chinese provinces -- Beijing, Shanghai, Fujian and Guangdong.

    Thursday, July 1, 2004

    Weekly publisher becomes Times columnist

    Longtime weekly newspaper publisher Jerry Fuchs resigned from the Peninsula Independent newspapers on Wednesday (June 30) to join the San Mateo County Times, where he'll be a columnist and associate publisher, according to the Times. Fuchs said he chose to leave the Independent because he disagreed with decisions made by the newly formed Anschutz Newspaper Group since Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz bought the San Francisco Examiner and Independent newspaper chain in February. Fuchs' political column, "Nobody Asked Me, But...," will continue at the Times, where it will run Tuesday through Saturday on the editorial page, starting July 13.

    Welcome to the Press Club's Blog

    Welcome dear reader to the Peninsula Press Club's Web log, where journalists and others interested in the news business can read and discuss the latest media news. Click on the link for each article and post your reactions. You can identify yourself or remain anonymous. Vigorous debate is welcomed, but please be courteous.

    Monday, June 14, 2004

    June 2004 Press Club board minutes

    Minutes of the June 10 Peninsula Press Club board meeting held at the San Mateo Daily News, 2600 El Camino Real. In attendance were Dave Price, Aimee Lewis, John Kane, Jack Russell and Michelle Carter. Executive Director Darryl Compton was also in attendance. Justin Nyberg, Ed Remitz and Bill Workman were absent.

    Meeting was called to order by President Michelle Carter at 6:27 p.m.

    1. There was some discussion regarding classifications for the annual awards competition. Carter received an e-mail from Nyberg expressing disappointment that the Examiner was not included in the below 75,000 circulation category. Nyberg suggested that the free dailies be separated from the paid dailies in the competition. However, some difficulties with the proposal and alternatives were discussed. General consensus of the board is that it should find a way to allow for a fair competition.

    2. Treasurer's report. Compton reported that the club was doing well financially and was expecting $1,645 in additional income from the awards dinner from attendees who did not pay.

    3. High school/college scholarship. There was some discussion on raising the amount of the scholarships to generate new interest while also looking for additional sponsors/donors. Compton reported that SAMCAR is interested in donating $1,500 for a scholarship to be given out at the annual awards competition. It was decided that board members should try to come up with ideas to raise revenue for scholarships.

    4. Annual meeting/board elections. Carter announced that the election/annual meeting will take place in September.

    Price mentioned that Bench/Bar Media will need a new coordinator since Daily News reporter Melanie Carrol left the area in search of the American Dream.

    The minutes of the May meeting were approved.

    The meeting was adjourned by Carter at 7:40 p.m.

    Minutes submitted by Jon Mays.

    Thursday, May 27, 2004

    2004 Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards

    FOSTER CITY — Bay Area print journalists, photographers, radio and television personnel and public relations professionals were presented with 180 awards of excellence in 72 categories at the Peninsula Press Club's 27th annual Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards dinner here tonight.

    The Peninsula Press Club's annual Professional Journalism Awards Competition dinner was held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Foster City.

    The winners were selected from 462 entries from media professionals in the 11 Greater Bay Area counties. Competition was for work done in 2003. Entries were judged by the Houston Press Club, The Press Club of Cleveland, Press Club of New Orleans, San Diego Press Club, The Press Club of Southeast Texas and the Press Photographers Association of Greater Los Angeles.

    At the dinner, San Mateo County Supervisor Mike Nevin announced that the Press Room at the San Mateo County Hall of Justice in Redwood City would be named in honor of the late Janet Parker Beck, the prize-winning and much-honored reporter for The San Mateo Times who died in 1994. Janet's husband, Jim Beck, and daughter, Mandy Beck, accepted the proclamation from Nevin.

    Winners of $1,500 Herb Caen Scholarships were Hannibal Deiz, editor-in-chief of the Burlingame High School newspaper, and Mia James, a staffer on the Lowell High School, San Francisco, newspaper. The Peninsula Press Club annually awards $1,500 scholarships each to college and high school journalism students. In addition, a one-time award of $500 in memory of Jim Monroe, past president of the Press Club, was presented to Jeff Gibson of College Park High School in Pleasant Hill.

    The complete list of winners follows:


    NEWSPAPERS - Dailies over 75,000 circulation (Division A)


    Editorial
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Lost legislators," John Diaz
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Dam Spam," Miguel Helft
    Honorable Mention: San Jose Mercury News, "10 districts, 10 fiefdoms," Barbara Marshman

    Editorial Cartoon
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Post-Saddam Fallout," Don Asmussen
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "I'm Being Groped!," Tom Meyer

    Columns
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "The Columns of Sue Hutchison," Sue Hutchison
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "The Columns of Jon Carroll," Jon Carroll
    Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat, "The Columns of Ann DuBay," Ann DuBay

    News Story
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Schwarzenegger's new role: Candidate," San Jose Mercury News Staff
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "How the doping scandal unfolded," Mark Fainaru-Wada, Lance Williams

    Feature Story of Light Nature
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Zoo penguins intent on futile 'migration'," Patricia Yollin

    Feature Story of Serious Nature
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Lost Girls," Joan Ryan
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Why Burnout?," Larry Slonaker
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Chronicle, "Agassi in Ascendance," Jim Doyle

    Series
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Social Services coverage in Santa Clara County," Karen de Sa
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "McCoy's Marines," John Koopman
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Chronicle, "Shame of the City," Kevin Fagan

    Technology Story
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "India's global calling," Aaron Davis, Margaret Steen
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Inside Google," Mary Anne Ostrom, Matt Marshall

    Business Story
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Oracle makes hostile offer," Mary Anne Ostrom, Therese Poletti, Peter Delevett
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Frends of Frank," Mercury News Business Staff
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Chronicle, "Bay to Baghdad," David R. Baker, Todd Wallack, Carrie Kirby

    Entertainment Review
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "No matter how you say it, 'Gigli' stinks," Bruce Newman
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Living history of jazz," Richard Scheinin

    Page Design
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Darkness and Flames," Kevin Wendt, Pai, Sylvia Ulloa, Phil Loubere, Karl Kahler, Shraddha Swaroop
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "The Southern California Fires," Kevin Wendt, Pai, Sylvia Ulloa, Phil Loubere, Karl Kahler, Shraddha Swaroop

    Headline
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Hooters at the Wharf - there goes the neighborhood?," Jennifer Thelen
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Reagan image: New deal for the dime?," Darren Richardson

    Specialty Story
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Eat at Joe's," Kim Severson
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "True grits," Aleta Watson
    Honorable Mention: The Press Democrat, "The battle behind foie gras," Derek J. Moore

    Sports Story
    First Place: Tie
    San Jose Mercury News, "Ring Master," Daniel Brown
    The Press Democrat, "A Fighting Lifestyle," Lowell Cohn

    Sports Column
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "The Columns of Mark Purdy," Mark Purdy

    Web Site
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "www.mercurynews.com," San Jose Mercury News Staff


    NEWSPAPERS - Dailies under 75,000 circulation (Division B)

    Editorial
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Legislators fail us once again," Jon Mays
    Second Place: San Mateo County Times, "Sneaky supes try to slip in raises for top officials," Terry Winckler
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News, "Principal Makes the Right Call," Dave Price

    Editorial Cartoon
    First Place: San Mateo Daily News, "They're all disabilities," James Hummel
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Heavy Lifting for Arnold," Steve Curl
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News, "Fight for peace," Steve Curl

    Columns
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Off the Beat," Michelle Durand
    Second Place: Daily Journal, "Graceland: The kids in the hall," Grace S. Kallis

    News Story
    First Place: San Mateo County Times, "E. Palo Alto man free after 12 years in jail," Suzanne Zalev
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Strangers touched by death," Christine Lias
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News, "Mystery symbols point to Mercury," Jean Whitney

    Feature Story of Light Nature
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "12 days, and a shrinking checkbook," Dana Yates
    Second Place: San Mateo County Times, "The Track that Seabiscuit Built," Malaika Fraley
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Daily News, "Circuitous route proves faster than Lytton," Richard Cole, Jean Whitney

    Feature Story of Serious Nature
    First Place: San Mateo County Times, "Suicide on no one's watch," Amy Yarbrough, Tim Hay
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Homelessness has a familiar face," Christine Lias
    Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Local push paves way for state privacy law," Michelle Durand

    Series
    First Place: San Mateo County Times, "Back to School," T.S. Mills-Faraudo & Staff
    Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "BALCO steroid bust, scandal," Dana Yates
    Honorable Mention: Los Gatos Daily News, "Cities approach e-mail law differently," Christina Bellantoni

    Technology Story
    First Place: Los Gatos Daily News, "E-mail and City Hall," Christina Bellantoni
    Second Place: San Mateo County Times, "King of the Hill," Tim Simmers

    Business Story
    First Place: San Mateo County Times, "Larry's Way or the Highway," Tim Simmers
    Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "SARS is a boon for San Mateo drug company," Yunmi Choi
    Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Cell phone users want better deal," Yunmi Choi

    Entertainment Review
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "The Evolution of Creating a Master Race," Cheri Lucas
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "'Lion' roars with oddball treachery," John Angell Grant
    Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Extremists exist in all religions," Cheri Lucas

    Page Design
    First Place: Marin Independent Journal, "The Last of California's Missions," Dennis Bolt
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Thursday, August 7, 2003," Brian Bothun
    Honorable Mention: Marin Independent Journal, "Marin's Biological Battleground," Dennis Bolt

    Headline
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Hollywood Ending," Ramkumar Venkatraman
    Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Crab conflict boils over," Jon Mays
    Honorable Mention: Los Gatos Daily News, "Longer bar hours on tap," Christine Lias

    Specialty Story
    First Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Space has taught a lot about fitness," Larry Magid
    Second Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Coastal water advocates fight for jet ski ban," Michelle Durand
    Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Painter inaugurates San Mateo gallery," Cheri Lucas

    Sports Story
    First Place: San Mateo Daily News, "Vasser to the max," Emanuel Lee
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "Cardinal Breakthrough," John Reid
    Honorable Mention: San Mateo Daily Journal, "Shortcuts may be legal but are they worth it?," Nathan Mollat

    Sports Column
    First Place: San Mateo Daily News, "Feldman manages hitters," Emanuel Lee
    Second Place: San Mateo Daily News, "Serra's Walsh goes the extra mile...26 of them," Emanuel Lee

    Web Site
    First Place: San Mateo Daily Journal, "www.smdailyjournal.com," Jon Mays
    Second Place: Palo Alto Daily News, "www.paloaltodailynews.com," Dave Price


    NEWSPAPERS - Non-dailies (Division C)

    Editorial
    First Place: Los Gatos Weekly-Times, "Flag Burning," Dick Sparrer
    Second Place: San Francisco Business Times, "Bay Area loses when NIMBYs raze the roof," Jim Gardner
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Business Times, "Music industry tone deaf to market demand," Jim Gardner

    Columns
    First Place: The Willow Glen Resident, "Columns of Moryt Milo," Moryt Milo
    Second Place: San Francisco Business Times, "Columns of Steve Symanovich," Steve Symanovich
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly, "Columns of Bill D'Agostino," Bill D'Agostino

    News Story
    First Place: San Francisco Bay Guardian, "Innocent," Adam Clay Thompson
    Second Place: The Willow Glen Resident, "Resident is burglarized, information from postal 'mail stop'," Moryt Milo
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Examiner, "County failed to investigate child's killer," Sara Zaske

    Feature Story of Light Nature
    First Place: San Francisco Examiner, "A legend lives on, for now," Sabrina Crawford
    Second Place: Pacific Sun, "Music Dreams," Jill Kramer
    Honorable Mention: The Independent, "Mushrooming Business," Sara Zaske

    Feature Story of Serious Nature
    First Place: Pacific Sun, "Autism Questions," Jill Kramer
    Second Place: Pacific Sun, "New Beginnings," Jill Kramer
    Honorable Mention: Silicon Valley Biz Ink, "Beating the odds," Jennifer Maragoni

    Series
    First Place: The Independent, "SSF fatality might have been avoided," Justin Nyberg
    Second Place: Silicon Valley Biz Ink, "Organizing the Valley: Offshoring," Rhonda Ascierto, Steve Tanner, Tom Kaneshige
    Honorable Mention: The Independent, "Stand & Deliver," Independent Newspaper Group

    Technology Story
    First Place: San Francisco Business Times, "Anti-terrorism Inc.," Daniel S. Levine
    Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly, "Security Breach," Rachel Metz
    Honorable Mention: San Francisco Business Times, "Tapping into Wireless," Daniel S. Levine

    Business Story
    First Place: San Francisco Business Times, "Breaking Point: Workers' Comp in California," Mark Calvey, Daniel S. Levine, Elizabeth Browne
    Second Place: San Francisco Business Times, "Upward Trend," Daniel S. Levine, Thomas Pisarek
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly, "The Doctor is Out," Jocelyn Dong

    Entertainment Review
    First Place: Palo Alto Weekly, "Review of 'Hulk'," Tyler Martin Hanley
    Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly, "A voice that deserves to be heard," Marc Burkhardt
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly, "Review of 'Casa de los Babys'," Susan Tavernetti

    Page Design
    First Place: Palo Alto Weekly, "Upfront, 'The worst of times' State of the City package," Allen Clapp
    Second Place: Tie
    Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal, "Field of Greens," Jessica A. Maille
    Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal, "Assessments take dive," Jessica A. Maille

    Headline
    First Place: Los Gatos Weekly-Times, "Traffic plan could mean no Wraight turn,"

    Dick Sparrer
    Second Place: Saratoga News, "Students making their pointe," Dick Sparrer

    Specialty Story
    First Place: Pacific Sun, "Healthcare Fix," Jill Kramer
    Second Place: Palo Alto Weekly, "Rock 'n' Roll Queens," Marc Burkhardt
    Honorable Mention: Palo Alto Weekly, "Keeping up Appearances," Jocelyn Dong

    Sports Story
    First Place: Cupertino Courier, "Wrestling Pioneers," Dick Sparrer
    Second Place: The Campbell Reporter, "Campbell Wolverine coaches are out there for the love of the game," Moryt Milo

    Sports Column
    First Place: The Independent, "North County softball struggles," Matt Elliser

    Web Site
    First Place: San Francisco Business Times, "sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com,"
    Steven E. F. Brown, Jessica Materna


    PRINT PHOTOGRAPHY (Division D)

    Spot News Photo
    First Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Fleeing Crossfire," Pauline Lubens
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Detained," Michael Macor
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    Santa Cruz Sentinel, "Fire: Raging Bulls," Shmuel Thaler
    Associated Press, "Lost Home in So.Cal. Fire," Paul Sakuma

    General News Photo
    First Place: The Press Democrat, "Grief for fallen Marine," Christopher Chung
    Second Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Oakland Murder victim," Carlos Avila Gonzalez
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    San Jose Mercury News, "War Protest," Meri Simon
    Palo Alto Daily News, "Tearful Goodbye," Michael G. Schennum

    Feature Photo
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Fur Flies," Elizabeth Hafalia
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Soaring Silhouette," Richard Koci Hernandez
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    San Jose Mercury News, "Father & Son Sweat," Susanna Frohman
    The Press Democrat, "Celebration of Survival," Christopher Chung

    Sports Action Photo
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Red Sox Collision," Lacy Atkins
    Second Place: Associated Press, "Up & Over for 49ers Score," Paul Sakuma
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    Santa Cruz Sentinel, "Race for title real toss-up: Soccer mirror image," Shmuel Thaler
    Palo Alto Daily News, "Tagged Out," Tony Avelar

    Sports Feature Photo
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Joy Uncorked," Deanne Fitzmaurice
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Raider Nation," Jim Gensheimer
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    Associated Press, "Lost to Stanford," Paul Sakuma
    Palo Alto Weekly, "Teammates Celebrate," Norbert von der Groeben

    Photo Series or Picture Story
    First Place: San Francisco Chronicle, "Living in the Nowhere," Brant Ward
    Second Place: San Jose Mercury News, "Caught in a Crossfire," Pauline Lubens
    Honorable Mention: Tie
    San Jose Mercury News, "California Recalls a Governor," Dai Sugano
    The Press Democrat, "Wine Country Caves," John Burgess


    TELEVISION PHOTOGRAPHY (Division E)


    Feature Photography
    First Place: KNTV NBC 11, "Wine Country Living," Mark Oltz
    Second Place: KFTY - 50, "Bollini Composite," Chris Bollini

    Sports Photography
    First Place: KFTY - 50, "Going the Distance," Chris Bollini


    TELEVISION (Division F)


    Breaking News
    First Place: KPIX CBS 5, "Oakland Riots," KPIX News Team

    Feature News
    First Place: KPIX CBS 5, "Consumer Watch - Cell Phones," Jeanette Pavini
    Second Place: KNTV NBC 11, "The Shark Shield," Dean C. Smith, Kim Stephens Pendergast
    Honorable Mention: KPIX CBS 5, "DNA Heritage," Sue Kwon

    Public Affairs Program
    First Place: KPIX CBS 5, "San Francisco Mayoral Debate," Daniel Rosenheim, Stephanie Danford, Dana King, Hank Plante

    Special Programming
    First Place: KNTV NBC 11, "Wine Country Living: Bachelor Family Winery," Mary Orlin, Mark Oltz, Mary Babbitt, Carrie Cain, Susan Sjoblom
    Second Place: KPIX CBS 5, "In Perspective," Daniel Rosenheim, Peter Saiers, Dana King, Ken Bastida, Hank Plante

    Documentary
    First Place: KCSM 60, "The Railroad Empire," Kaveh Nikpour, Dante Betteo
    Second Place: KNTV NBC 11, "Wine Country Living Composite," Mary Orlin, Mark Oltz, Mary Babbitt, Carrie Cain



    RADIO (Division G)

    Breaking News
    First Place: KCBS Radio, "Homefront," KCBS News Team
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "Recall History," John Myers

    Feature News
    First Place: KQED-FM, "Threshold," Sarah Varney
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "Asthma," Deirdre Kennedy

    Public Affairs Program
    First Place: KCBS Radio, "Tumbling Dice," Doug Sovern
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "The California Report Magazine," The California Report Staff

    Interview or Talk Show
    First Place: KQED-FM, "Forum: Children of Incarcerated Parents," Michael Krasny, Raul Ramirez, Robin Gianattassio-Malle, Hermione Gee, Keven Guillory
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "Forum: Foster Care," Michael Krasny, Raul Ramirez, Robin Gianattassio-Malle, Hermione Gee, Dan Zoll

    Special Progrmming
    First Place: KCBS Radio, "California Recall," KCBS News Team
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "Health Dialogues," Health Dialogues Staff

    Documentary
    First Place: KCBS Radio, "Homeless Patrol," Doug Sovern
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "The California Report: Education Special," The California Report Staff
    Sports Story
    First Place: KQED-FM, "Baseball Vendors," Sarah Varney
    Second Place: KQED-FM, "Rock Climber," Jason Margolis


    MAGAZINES / Trade publications (Division H)

    News Story
    First Place: San Jose Magazine, "How 'Bout Those A's," Bill Workman
    Second Place: Gentry Magazine, "Celebrating 100 Years of the Commonwealth Club," Bill Workman
    Honorable Mention: Wines & Vines Magazine, "Gary Farrell: Living The Dream," Jean Deitz Sexton

    Review/column
    First Place: San Jose Magazine, "Rich Man, Poor Man," Murry Frymer
    Second Place: San Jose Magazine, "Up Front: Struggling Students: Being Set Up to Fail?," Larry Gerston
    Honorable Mention: San Jose Magazine, "Paying for Terrorism at Home," Larry Gerston

    Page Design
    First Place: San Jose Magazine, "A Clear Look at Lasik," Jerome Callens
    Second Place: Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal, "Life sciences VC firms hit same hurdles as tech," Cynthia Sheets
    Honorable Mention: San Jose Magazine, "Unstoppable," Jerome Callens


    PUBLIC RELATIONS (Division I)

    Newsletter
    First Place: Michelle Carter Consulting, "United American Bank Newsletter, 12/03," Michelle Carter
    Second Place: NATAS SF/NorCal, "Off Camera" National Television Academy Newsletter, 11/03," David Mills, Darryl Compton

    Press Kit
    First Place: NATAS SF/NorCal, "Emmy 2003," Deanne Moenster, Darryl Compton


    SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

    Herb Caen $1,500 Scholarship:
    Hannibal Diaz, Burlingame High School, Burlingame
    Mia James, Lowell High School, San Francisco
    Jim Monroe $500 Scholarship:
    Jeff Gibson, College Park High School, Pleasant Hill

    Saturday, May 22, 2004

    May 2004 Press Club board minutes

    Minutes for Peninsula Press Club Board of Directors meeting on May 12, 2004:


    Meeting commenced at 6:26 p.m. Directors present: Micki Carter, Jack Russell, Justin Nyberg, Bill Workman and Ed Remitz. Also present: Darryl Compton, Executive Director. Absent: Dave Price, Aimee Lewis and Jon Mays.

    • Carter announced that Dave Price was absent with a good reason. His wife Mae had given birth to their first child, Jack, a few days earlier. Congratulations, Dave and Mae!

    • Carter introduced directors to a visitor at the meeting, Adrien Varnedoe, photo editor for the San Francisco Observer and Haight Ashbury Beat.

    • Directors voted 5-0 to approve minutes from the previous meeting.

    • Compton reported that the treasury is "all sound" as preparations continue for the awards dinner on May 27. He provided a detailed financial document and reported that invitations have been sent to PCC members.

    • Directors discussed and agreed upon voluntary work assignments among them for the awards dinner.

    • Carter reported that the high school journalism awards proceeded successfully although one high school's entries were lost in transit. It was agreed that Darryl Compton would take receipt of entries next year. Hillsdale Shopping Center provided $355 for the high school program. Carter also proposed adding a website category to the high school competition. The matter will be reviewed in December.

    • Nyberg reported that the new "happy hour" event held on May 6 attracted about 12 attendees and was well received. He said another event might be appropriate in June. Nyberg said he wants the club to continue exploring "value-added resources" for members. Workman suggested exploring discounts at a Redwood City music club.

    • Carter noted that the next newsletter deadline is June 9.

    • Jack Russell reported that the club's scholarship committee was impressed with the high school and college candidates it interviewed. He thanked PPC members John Kane, Dee Fastenau, Ed Remitz and Sam Goldman for serving with him on the committee. Scholarship recipients will be honored as part of the May 27 awards dinner.


    In new business...

    • Directors agreed that the annual picnic will be held on Sept. 26 at the home of Micki Carter.

    • Compton requested that the PPC join with other media organizations in supporting an organization creating a broadcast archive for Northern California. A pamphlet provided by Compton reads that The Broadcast Archives and Museum of Northern California will "serve as an educational and archival resource for the preservation and presentation of historic Northern California radio and television broadcasts, equipment, printed documents, and memorabilia." Supporters of the effort include San Francisco State University and the Society of Professional Journalists.

    Workman moved that the PPC join supporters of the archive. Russell seconded the motion. The vote was 5-0 in favor.

    The meeting adjourned at 7:22 p.m.

    Submitted by Ed Remitz

    Friday, May 7, 2004

    Winners announced in high school contest

    The Burlingame B, the student newspaper at Burlingame High School, took first-place honors in General Excellence and a total of nine awards in the 2003-2004 High School Journalism Awards Competition.

    The contest is sponsored by the Peninsula Press Club, Hillsdale Shopping Center and the journalism program at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont. Awards were presented at a reception May 5 in Ralston Hall at NDNU.

    Ten publications from eight high schools from Daly City to Palo Alto offered more than 150 entries for the competition which covered April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. Members of the Press Club served as judges for the contest.

    This is the first year that Palo Alto was included in the program, and three publications from Palo Alto High School -- the student magazine Verde, the student newspaper The Campanile and the student Web site The Paly Voice -- were among the winners.

    Here's a complete list of the winners:

    GENERAL EXCELLENCE
    First: Burlingame B, Burlingame High School
    Second: The Thunderbolt, Mills High School
    Honorable Mention: The Tom-Tom, Jefferson High School

    LAYOUT AND DESIGN
    First: Burlingame B, Burlingame High School
    Second: The Tom-Tom, Jefferson High School
    Honorable Mention: The Thunderbolt, Mills High School

    EDITORIALS
    First: Joyce Lin, The Mills Thunderbolt
    Second: Warren Dizon, The Jefferson Tom-Tom
    Honorable Mention: Nina Anissimov, Burlingame B

    FEATURE STORY
    First: Jackie Javerbaum, Palo Alto Verde
    Second: Daniel Evers, Palo Alto Verde
    Honorable Mention: Alexis Salas, Jefferson Tom-Tom
    Honorable Mention: Rachel Zwass, Mills Thunderbolt
    Honorable Mention: Meiyang Liu, Burlingame B
    Honorable Mention: Brittany Loobey, Mills Thunderbolt

    NEWS STORY
    First: Daniel Evers, Palo Alto Verde
    Second: Bimo El Gamal, Palo Alto Campanile
    Honorable Mention: Karen Gonzalez and Jennifer Saldana, Jefferson Tom-Tom

    SPORTS STORY
    First: Diego Del Barco, Capuchino Stampede
    Second (a tie): Liz McKenna, Hillsdale Scroll, and Nicole Dungca, Mills Thunderbolt
    Honorable Mention: Andrew Sosnick, Mills Thunderbolt
    Honorable Mention: Nathan Ford, Paly Voice, Palo Alto High School

    NEWS PHOTO
    First: Hannah Hart, Burlingame B
    Second: Hannah Hart, Burlingame B
    Honorable Mention: Lashannda Worthy, Jefferson Tom-Tom

    SPORTS PHOTO
    First: Dan Rothman, Burlingame B
    Second: Dan Rothman, Burlingame B
    Honorable Mention: Dan Rothman, Burlingame B

    FEATURE PHOTO
    First: Jessica Fields, Palo Alto Verde
    Second: Jessica Fields, Palo Alto Verde
    Honorable Mention: Annie Ryan, Palo Alto Verde

    Thursday, April 15, 2004

    April 2004 Press Club board minutes

    Minutes from the April 2004 PPC Board meeting held at the San Mateo Daily News, 2600 El Camino Real. Ed Remitz was absent. In attendance were Micki Carter, Bill Workman, Jon Mays, Justin Nyberg, John Kane, Aimee Lewis, Jack Russell and Darryl Compton.

    The meeting was called to order at 6:30 p.m. by President Carter -- Micki Carter that is.

    1. Minutes of the March meeting were approved.

    2. A discussion was held regarding whether submissions from Web sites and Verde -- a magazine produced by students at Palo Alto High School -- should be considered for the high school competition. The board voted to allow individual submissions. Entries for general excellence and design will not be considered since these categories are reserved for newspapers. The board also agreed to discuss the rules of future contests at a later date. Entries were divvied up for judging.

    3. The board heard a treasurer's report from Compton. Compton reported an increase in membership and award contest entries.

    4. Compton said all award contest entries are currently being judged.

    5. Lewis reported that everything is set for the award dinner.

    6. Russell reported that 10 high school students and one college student showed interest in the Herb Caen scholarship. Interviews will be conducted soon. There was some discussion on the need of getting more entries.

    7. Price proposed putting ads on the club's Web site. Proposal will be considered at a later date.

    8. The board decided to give a $500 scholarship to a student in the name of former press club president Jim Monroe.

    9. Nyberg gave an update on his effort to organize a press club happy hour.

    The meeting was adjourned at 7:35 p.m. Minutes recorded by Jon Mays.

    Thursday, March 11, 2004

    March 2004 Press Club board meeting

    Minutes of the March 10, 2004 Peninsula Press Club board meeting held at the San Mateo Daily News, 2600 El Camino Real. Jon Mays, Aimee Lewis were absent, Justin Nyberg arrived a few minutes after the start of the meeting. In attendance were John Kane, Bill Workman, Ed Remitz, Jack Russell, Micki Carter and Dave Price.

    Meeting was called to order at 6:18 p.m. by President Micki Carter.

    1. Minutes of the February meeting were approved.

    2. Treasurer's report: Darryl Compton reported that about $13,000 in contest entry fees and new memberships was received in the past month.

    3. Awards competition: Darryl pointed out that the PPC received 440 entries this year compared to 453 last year.

    Justin Nyberg asked that entries from the Examiner go into the category of "dailies under 75,000 circulation." However, the Examiner as recently as Feb. 20, 2004 had printed that its circulation is 76,000 per day, Dave Price said. After a discussion, board members felt it was not appropriate to put the Examiner into a lower circulation category, but since all articles in the Examiner were also published in the twice-weekly Independent, board members felt the Examiner entries could be included in the non-daily category. After discussion, Nyberg agreed. John Kane made a motion to that effect and it was carried without opposition. The board agreed to revisit the subject before next year's contest.

    4. Contest judging: Darryl distributed to board members entries from contests held by press clubs in other parts of the country. PPC board members will judge contests held by the Press Club of Cleveland, Press Club of New Orleans and the Press Club of Southeast Texas. In exchange, those clubs will judge PPC entries.

    5. Newsletter: Deadline to send Micki Carter information is March 15.

    6. Web site: Price reported adding a number of media-oriented news stories to the site. John Kane asked for a counter and Price agreed to add one.

    7. Bench-Bar-Media: Justin suggested that before future meetings, possible topics could be sent to participants and that a moderator could be chosen.

    8. New business:

    Darryl said the Press Club has been using his personal home phone for the past few years, but now that he's married, he'd like the Press Club to share the phone he has for the Broadcast Legends, 341-7420. That would require the PPC to pay half the phone bill of $35 per month. John Kane moved to have the PPC pay half the bill and the board agreed without dissent. New number will be added to the PPC home page.

    Justin said he would like the PPC to sponsor more events, such as a happy hour for journalists. He said he would be willing to organize it. Board members appeared to favor the idea. After the meeting, Justin suggested holding it at the Prince of Wales bar on 25th Avenue in San Mateo. Date to be announced.

    The board meeting was adjourned at 7:20 p.m.

    Minutes submitted by Dave Price, acting in the absence of Secretary Jon Mays.

    Thursday, February 26, 2004

    ANG closes six newspapers

    San Mateo County Times Staff Report

    SAN MATEO -- Six San Mateo County weekly newspapers owned by Alameda Newspaper Group are ceasing publication Saturday so their resources can be used to expand and improve the group's daily San Mateo County Times, Times Publisher Dan Cruey said Thursday.

    He characterized the move as an opportunity to improve the Times' news and advertising content.

    Closing down are the Coastside Chronicle, Millbrae Recorder-Progress, Daly City Recorder, San Bruno Herald, Times Weekend and the South San Francisco Enterprise-Journal.

    Although some of the weeklies have been around for decades, they have been little more than advertising vehicles for many years, Cruey said, and lacked the editorial content that local readers need and want.

    "By taking the weeklies' resources and putting them into the Times, we will be creating a much more localized and powerful daily newspaper -- which readers have told us they want," Cruey said. No jobs are being lost due to the closure.

    By closing the weeklies, a recently launched ANG/ADVO advertising partnership program will benefit county residents by moving additional advertising material into the Times itself, Cruey said.

    He noted that almost all of the content in the weeklies had been already printed in The Times. The only original content, Carolyn Livengood's report, will be available to readers through the Times, he said.

    The Times is the oldest continually published daily newspaper in the county.

    ANG is part of Media News Group, a nationwide chain of newspapers and other media outlets owned by Dean Singleton.

    Monday, February 23, 2004

    Paper trail shows how the Ex was won

    Billionaire Philip Anschutz went from Bay to Breakers to buyer


    Feb. 23, 2004


    By Amy Bryer
    American Business Journals

    Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz ran the 7.46-mile Bay to Breakers race last May in 1 hour, 18 minutes, an excellent time for a man in his 60s, by anyone's standards.

    Nine months later, he was on his way to owning the famous foot race's sponsor -- The San Francisco Examiner -- in a deal announced Thursday.

    Anschutz will take over the Examiner from San Francisco's Fang family, which has operated the Examiner since 2000. The deal also includes other newspapers published by the Fangs, including the San Francisco Independent and the San Mateo Independent as well as related properties. Terms aren't being disclosed.

    Anschutz becomes the fourth owner of the Examiner since it began publishing in 1865 and which later became part of the fabled empire of William Randolph Hearst, whose life was the model for the movie "Citizen Kane."

    Anschutz, an oilman-turned-billionaire investor and founder of Denver-based Qwest Communications, is described by close associates as a "news junkie." He reads dozens of magazines, trade journals, newspapers and other publications.

    But you'll rarely see a quote from Anschutz in any of them. To say that Anschutz is publicity shy is a gross understatement. He politely, but flatly, refuses to be interviewed and has for years.

    So why did someone so assiduous about keeping his name out of the media come to be an owner.

    "For (Anschutz), this is just a good business deal, a good investment," said a source close to the deal, when asked why the notoriously publicity-shy Anschutz would want to buy a newspaper. "It's something that (Anschutz has) thought about for a long, long time. All of the things fell into place ... a great name, an enormous market. From a business standpoint, everything made sense."


    Birth of a deal



    The deal started last May. Returning home to Denver with a copy of the Examiner under his arm, Anschutz asked his investment staff to look into the troubled newspaper as a possible investment.

    Not long after, the Fang family began exploring how it might spin off some or all of its assets, including the rights to the race, the Examiner newspaper and the two Independent newspapers and commercial printing plant.

    Last fall, following the death of Douglas Fang after a battle with stomach cancer, talks began in earnest between Anschutz representatives and the Fangs. On Dec. 23, the parties signed an agreement in principle.

    Anschutz takes over a newspaper company that has been on a long slide downhill for years, but especially since Hearst jettisoned the Examiner in its purchase of the more successful and bigger circulation San Francisco Chronicle.

    The San Francisco Independent and the San Mateo newspapers publish two to three days a week, respectively.

    Anschutz Co. representatives would not reveal the cost of the purchase, but as part of the sale for the three newspapers, Anschutz also will own the Examiner-sponsored Bay to Breakers race.

    Together, the papers have a combined circulation of 436,000, which is on par with the 512,000 circulation at the competing San Francisco Chronicle, although it's hard to directly compare circulation because one paper reports daily paid circulation and the others are free or so-called "general circulation" publications. They use different auditing services to certify circulation to advertisers.

    One big strength: 95 percent of the San Mateo County subscribers are home deliveries, said Scott McKibben, CEO for ExIn, the Fang's newspaper company, who will remain as CEO of SF Newspaper Co.

    "There's a demand for an alternative to the Chronicle," McKibben said. "They don't have the household penetration advertisers need."


    Three potential buyers



    The Examiner, a free daily circulated Monday-Friday, has been in a tailspin for a year. It laid off most of its employees in February 2003. In December more job cuts were made.

    After COO Douglas Fang's death, the family was more interested in selling, but initially the Bay to Breakers race was the first asset on the chopping block. As time went on, the deal grew to include the newspapers and the company's production facility, but the Fang family did not give up the paper easily even after it was up for sale, McKibben said.

    There were three serious buyers; the Anschutz representatives won't say who they were.

    In addition to McKibben staying on as CEO, longtime Anschutz adviser Robert Starzel will be chairman of the SF Newspaper Co.

    To an outsider, it's a curiosity that Anschutz would be attracted to investing in a newspaper.

    "He's always had in the back of his mind that newspapers have a great deal of influence and he'd like them to have a good influence," Starzel said. "It's an altruistic investment I think he thinks will be good for the city."

    Anschutz cares about San Francisco and has seen it in good times and bad, he said. When the 1989 earthquake hit, Anschutz was stuck in Oakland and hopped a helicopter into San Francisco. He lived in the city for about five years around that time and has run the Bay to Breakers about a dozen times in the last 15 years.


    Sparking speculation



    As with most Anschutz investments, there will be much speculation as to his motivations for buying a struggling newspaper group with a combined newsroom staff of about 70 people in a town that already has a daily newspaper with 385 editorial staff.

    Anschutz has had some extraordinarily bad press in the last two years. Fortune magazine named him the nation's "greediest executive" for selling a portion of his interest in Qwest, even though he remains the company's biggest single shareholder.

    Some may suspect Anschutz may be trying to have control over his own media outlet to sway public opinion.

    "As a resident of this city, I can say that's a ludicrous, futile effort," Starzel said. "He's not about to change the way this city looks at the world."

    McKibben said he has adequate staff to focus on San Francisco and may consider adding resources in the future.

    One thing McKibben and Starzel say they aren't worried about: editorial interference from Anschutz. In fact, according to another of Anschutz' close advisers, he wants the paper to be respected for its balanced approach.

    "He wants an honest paper that deals with facts that doesn't get an agenda trying to prove something on the front page," Starzel said.

    In any case, the change of ownership marks to latest chapter in the Examiner's storied history.

    It's said that millionaire mining, real estate and ranching tycoon George Hearst, William Randolph Hearst's father, won the unprofitable Examiner in a card game in the late 1800s. The paper stayed in the Hearst family for more than 100 years. In 1965, the Examiner signed a Joint Operating Agreement with the Chronicle to combine business operations. As an afternoon daily, the Examiner had suffered from competition from television news and production difficulties that prevented it from publishing the freshest news. Then, in 2000, the Hearst Corp. decided to buy the competing Chronicle for $600 million and close the Examiner.

    Locals residents were up in arms at the thought of losing its two-paper town and the Justice Department intervened. To appease the federal government, Hearst sold the Examiner to the Fangs and sweetened the deal with a $66.7 million subsidy to the Fangs for three years.

    It essentially allowed the Fangs to be reimbursed by Hearst for any costs associated with continuing to publish the Examiner.

    That subsidy was up July 31, 2003.


    Building billions



    Like William Randolph Hearst's father, Anschutz made his money by taking risks and finding values in a wide range of industries. He's bought unlikely prospects and turned them into money makers.

    He made his first big money in the Utah oil fields in the 1970s. He built up his billionaire status with the Southern Pacific Railroad, which he owned until 1995 when it merged with the Union Pacific. Anschutz, however, retained the rights-of-way to the Southern Pacific and used it to construct a fiber-optic network that connected major cities the railroad passed through. That strategic move helped him start Qwest Communications International Inc.

    Anschutz has a keen eye for the art of the deal, associates say.

    "Typical of Phil, he does have foresight, but it's a kind of intuition that one can hardly sit here and be logical about," Starzel said.

    Amy Bryer is a reporter for the Denver Business Journal, an affiliated newspaper.

    (c) 2004 American City Business Journals Inc.